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The Employment of Married Mothers in Great Britain: 1974 - 2000

  • Paul Gregg
  • Maria Gutierrez-Domenech
  • Jane Waldfogel

    ()

This paper analyses the increase in mother’s employment in Britain over the period 1974-2000. The approach consists of isolating those whose birth cohorts whose mothers experienced significant increases in employment and relating those to changes in policies (maternity rights, taxation and childcare). The results suggest that maternity rights have induced a change in behaviour toward returning to work in the first year post-birth, among many mothers who would otherwise gone back to work when their children were age 3-5. This effect has been most marked among better educated and higher paid mothers and has strengthen as real wages have risen through time. However, the paper also suggests that the increased labour market experience and job tenure of mothers as a result of maternity rights legislation has only had a very modest impact on earnings. This is as a result of most of the extra experience being part-time which has very low returns.

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File URL: http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/CMPO/workingpapers/wp78.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series The Centre for Market and Public Organisation with number 03/078.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: May 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:03/078
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  1. Gregory, Mary & Jukes, Robert, 2001. "Unemployment and Subsequent Earnings: Estimating Scarring among British Men 1984-94," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(475), pages F607-25, November.
  2. Mike Brewer, 2001. "Comparing in-work benefits and the reward to work for families with children in the US and the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 22(1), pages 41-77, January.
  3. Stephen Nickell & Patricia Jones & Glenda Quintini, 2002. "A Picture of Job Insecurity Facing British Men," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(476), pages 1-27, January.
  4. Simon Burgess & Paul Gregg & Carol Propper & Elizabeth Washbrook & ALSPAC Study Team, 2002. "Maternity Rights and Mothers' Return to Work," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 02/055, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  5. Machin, Stephen, 1996. "Wage Inequality in the UK," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 47-64, Spring.
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