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Assessing Unemployment Traps in Belgium using Panel Data Sample Selection models

Author

Listed:
  • Anna Cristina d'Addio

    () (Aarhus School of Business)

  • Isabelle De Greef

    () (Université Catholique de Louvain)

  • Michael Rosholm

    () (University of Aarhus)

Abstract

In this paper we investigate whether unemployment traps exist and are significant in the transition from unemployment into employment in Belgium. In order to assess them, we use panel data sample selection models. Specifically, we estimate a parametric random effects models composed by a wage equation and a selection equation by maximum likelihood techniques. The income ratios have been computed for every individual in the sample by using the predicted wages obtained from the estimation of the wage equation corrected for sample selectivity. The empirical analyses has exploited the data extracted from the waves 1993-1997 of the Panel Study of Belgian Household and has been led separately on (unbalanced) samples of men and women. The estimation results suggest significant differences in the behaviour of these two groups. The experience of long periods of unemployment in the past is particularly important: long-term unemployed people have difficulties in re-integrating the labour market and they obtain low salaries when they succeed in finding employment. Long unemployment spells are likely to have a “scarring” effect on subsequent earnings. Moreover, the computation of income ratios for all individuals highlights the importance of unemployment traps for the women present in the sample. Indeed, their expected wage is often lower than their income while being unemployed. A significant proportion of the available samples (men and women) is shown to enter employment although this transition is accompanied by a substantial loss in their disposable income.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Cristina d'Addio & Isabelle De Greef & Michael Rosholm, 2002. "Assessing Unemployment Traps in Belgium using Panel Data Sample Selection models," 10th International Conference on Panel Data, Berlin, July 5-6, 2002 C1-3, International Conferences on Panel Data.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpd:pd2002:c1-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hagedorn, Marcus & Kaul, Ashok, 2002. "Langzeitarbeitslosigkeit in Deutschland: Fakten, Ursachen und Bekämpfung," IZA Discussion Papers 680, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Hugo Benítez-Silva, 2003. "Labor Supply Flexibility and Portfolio Choice: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers wp056, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    3. Amynah Vanessa Gangji & Robert Plasman, 2007. "The Matthew effect of unemployment: how does it affect wages in Belgium," DULBEA Working Papers 07-19.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods

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