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Employment and Wage Assimilation of Male First Generation Immigrants in Denmark

Author

Listed:
  • Husted, Leif

    (KORA - Danish Institute for Local and Regional Government Research)

  • Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    (Aarhus University)

  • Rosholm, Michael

    (Aarhus University)

  • Smith, Nina

    (Aarhus University)

Abstract

Labour market assimilation of Danish first generation male immigrants is analysed based on two panel data sets covering the population of immigrants and 10% of the Danish population during 1984-1995. Wages and employment probabilities are estimated jointly in a random effects model which corrects for unobserved cohort and individual effects and panel selectivity due to missing wage information. The results show that immigrants assimilate partially to Danes, but the assimilation process differs between refugees and non-refugees.

Suggested Citation

  • Husted, Leif & Nielsen, Helena Skyt & Rosholm, Michael & Smith, Nina, 2000. "Employment and Wage Assimilation of Male First Generation Immigrants in Denmark," IZA Discussion Papers 101, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp101
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigrants; earnings and employment assimilation;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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