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Macroeconomic Instability, Migration, and the Option Value of Education

Author

Listed:
  • Eliakim Katz

    (Department of Economics, Northern Illinois University)

  • Hillel Rapoport

    () (Bar Ilan University,and CREDPR,Department of Economics,Stanford University)

Abstract

We explore the relation between variability in the rate of return to human capital and investment in education in the context of migration. Specifically, we show that if migration is a possibility, such variability in the rate of return to human capital can induce residents of developing countries to make greater investments in education. Moreover, providing that education is relatively costly, variability in the return to human capital may increase the average level of education in a developing economy even after expected migration is netted out. Finally, our findings are shown to have explanatory power in relation to education and migratory patterns of minorities.

Suggested Citation

  • Eliakim Katz & Hillel Rapoport, 2001. "Macroeconomic Instability, Migration, and the Option Value of Education," Working Papers 2001-17, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:biu:wpaper:2001-17
    as

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    File URL: http://www.biu.ac.il/soc/ec/wp/17-01/17-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2003. "Ethnic discrimination and the migration of skilled labor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 159-172, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Macroeconomic instability; Income volatility; Migration; Human capital; Ethnic discrimination; Ethnic conflicts; Minorities.;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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