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Macroeconomic Policies, Instability and Growth in the World

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  • Elbadawi, Ibrahim
  • Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus

Abstract

High instability and low growth characterise the macroeconomic performance of most developing countries. Inadequate policies are often to blame. This paper documents the empirical regularities that characterise the relationships among macroeconomic/financial policies, instability and growth across developing and industrial nations. While successful transitions to low instability and high growth are not frequent, they have been observed in a dozen countries. Such win-win transitions require that institutions and rules be put in place to change government incentives for choosing between policies that reflect narrow interests or social conflict--contributing to more instability and less growth--and social welfare maximising policies that help growth and make economies more resilient to residual instability. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Elbadawi, Ibrahim & Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus, 1998. "Macroeconomic Policies, Instability and Growth in the World," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 7(0), pages 116-168, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:7:y:1998:i:0:p:116-68
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    Cited by:

    1. Gode, Constantino J., 2001. "Sovereign Debt and Uncertainty in the Mozambican Economy," WIDER Working Paper Series 130, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Zied Ftiti, 2010. "Stabilité-croissance et performance économique : quelle relation selon une revue de la littérature ?," Post-Print halshs-00537009, HAL.
    3. Vatcharin Sirimaneetham, 2006. "Explaining policy volatility in developing countries," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 06/583, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    4. Calderon, Cesar & Loayza, Norman & Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus, 2005. "Does openness imply greater exposure ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3733, The World Bank.
    5. César Calderón & Norman Loayza & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel, 2006. "External Conditions and Growth Performance," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Ricardo Caballero & César Calderón & Luis Felipe Céspedes & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Sc (ed.), External Vulnerability and Preventive Policies, edition 1, volume 10, chapter 3, pages 041-070 Central Bank of Chile.
    6. Eliakim Katz & Hillel Rapoport, 2001. "Macroeconomic Instability, Migration, and the Option Value of Education," Working Papers 2001-17, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    7. Ftiti, Zied, 2010. "The macroeconomic performance of the inflation targeting policy: An approach based on the evolutionary co-spectral analysis (extension for the case of a multivariate process)," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 468-476, January.
    8. César Calderón & Norman V. Loayza & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel, 2008. "Does Openness Imply Greater Vulnerability?," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 485, Central Bank of Chile.
    9. Christopher S. Adam & Stephen O'Connell, 1997. "Aid, taxation and development: analytical perspectives on aid effectiveness in sub-Saharan Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 1997-05, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

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