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Stabilité-croissance et performance économique : Quelle relation selon une revue de la littérature ?

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  • Zied Ftiti

    () (Université de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003, France; CNRS, GATE Lyon St Etienne, UMR 5824, 93, chemin des Mouilles, Ecully, F-69130, France; ENS-LSH, Lyon, France)

Abstract

L’objectif de ce papier est de proposer une synthèse de la littérature traitant la relation entre volatilité et croissance. L’intérêt de ce papier consiste à montrer que cette littérature a évolué dans deux sens contradictoires et que la plupart des économistes retiennent les résultats d’un des courants, soit en raison d’une ignorance de la seconde théorie, soit en prenant le courant qui les arrange. La relation entre volatilité et croissance a évolué dans un premier temps dans le sens d’une relation positive, puis la littérature a évoluée vers une relation négative. Dans ce papier, nous montrons les fondements théoriques de l’évolution de cette littérature.

Suggested Citation

  • Zied Ftiti, 2010. "Stabilité-croissance et performance économique : Quelle relation selon une revue de la littérature ?," Working Papers 1026, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
  • Handle: RePEc:gat:wpaper:1026
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    Keywords

    information; feedback; bias; motivation; experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • B22 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Macroeconomics
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • O42 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Monetary Growth Models

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