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Migration, human capital accumulation and economic development

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  • Di Maria, Corrado
  • Stryszowski, Piotr

Abstract

We study how the possibility of migration changes the composition of human capital in sending countries, and how this affects development. In our model, growth is driven by productivity growth, which occurs via imitation or innovation. Both activities use the same types of skilled labour as input, albeit with different intensities. Heterogenous agents accumulate skills in response to economic incentives. Migration distorts these incentives, and the accumulation of human capital. This slows down, or even hinders, economic development. The effect is stronger, the farther away the country is from the technological frontier.

Suggested Citation

  • Di Maria, Corrado & Stryszowski, Piotr, 2009. "Migration, human capital accumulation and economic development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 306-313, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:90:y:2009:i:2:p:306-313
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chepel, S. & Bondarenko, K., 2015. "Is the External Labor Migration an Economic Growth Factor: Econometric Analysis and Policy Implications for the CIS Countries," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 142-166.
    2. Brunilda Zenelaga & Kseanela Sotirofski, 2011. "The `Brain Gain Hypotheses` of Transition Countries Elites and Socioeconomic Development in Their Home Country (Albanian Emigrants in Italy Sample)," Working Papers 46, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.
    3. Naudé, Wim & Siegel, Melissa & Marchand, Katrin, 2015. "Migration, Entrepreneurship and Development: A Critical Review," IZA Discussion Papers 9284, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Ha, Wei & Yi, Junjian & Zhang, Junsen, 2016. "Brain drain, brain gain, and economic growth in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 322-337.
    5. Manca, Fabio, 2011. "Education, Catch-up and Growth in Spain," INVESTIGACIONES REGIONALES - Journal of REGIONAL RESEARCH, Asociación Española de Ciencia Regional, issue 20, pages 5-28.
    6. Di Maria, Corrado & Lazarova, Emiliya A., 2012. "Migration, Human Capital Formation, and Growth: An Empirical Investigation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 938-955.
    7. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    8. Naved Ahmad & Salman Arjumand, 2016. "Impact of corruption on GDP per capita through international migration: an empirical investigation," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1633-1643, July.
    9. Djajić, Slobodan, 2013. "Barriers to immigration and the dynamics of emigration," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 41-52.
    10. Sandra Liliana Botón Gómez & Patricia González Román, 2010. "Una revisión a los estudios sobre Migración Internacional en Colombia," REVISTA FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS ECONÓMICAS, UNIVERSIDAD MILITAR NUEVA GRANADA, June.
    11. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Baris Alpaslan, 2014. "Infrastructure and Industrial Development with Endogenous Skill Acquisition," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 195, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    12. Basu, Sujata & Keswani Mehra, Meeta, 2014. "Endogenous human capital formation, distance to frontier and growth," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 117-132.
    13. Masashi Tanaka, 2018. "Changing demand for general skills, technological uncertainty, and economic growth," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 18-02, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    14. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:5:p:676-:d:96676 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Basu, Suajta, 2014. "Intergenerational mobility, composition of human capital and distance to frontier," MPRA Paper 59110, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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