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Long-Term Economic Growth and the History of Technology

In: Handbook of Economic Growth

  • Mokyr, Joel
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    Modern economic growth started in the West in the early nineteenth century. This survey discusses the precise connection between the Industrial Revolution and the beginnings of growth, and connects it to the intellectual and economic factors underlying the growth of useful knowledge. The connections between science, technology and human capital are re-examined, and the role of the eighteenth century Enlightenment in bringing about modern growth is highlighted. Specifically, the paper argues that the Enlightenment changed the agenda of scientific research and deepened the connections between theory and practice.

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    This chapter was published in:
  • Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), 2005. "Handbook of Economic Growth," Handbook of Economic Growth, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 1, number 1.
  • This item is provided by Elsevier in its series Handbook of Economic Growth with number 1-17.
    Handle: RePEc:eee:grochp:1-17
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookseriesdescription.cws_home/BS_HE/description

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    1. Easterlin, Richard A., 1981. "Why Isn't the Whole World Developed?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(01), pages 1-17, March.
    2. Kremer, Michael, 1993. "Population Growth and Technological Change: One Million B.C. to 1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(3), pages 681-716, August.
    3. Pol AntrĂ s & Hans Joachim Voth, 2000. "Factor prices and productivity growth during the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Working Papers 495, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    4. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 1997. "Endogenous Growth Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262011662, August.
    5. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
    6. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2002. "Natural Selection And The Origin Of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1133-1191, November.
    7. Priestley, Joseph, 1768. "An Essay on the First Principles of Government; and on the Nature of Political, Civil, and Religious Liberty," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number priestley1768.
    8. Carlos, Ann M., 2003. "The Rise of Commercial Empires: England and the Netherlands in the Age of Mercantilism, 1650 1770. By David Ormond. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. ix, 388. $75.00," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 63(04), pages 1154-1155, December.
    9. Jones Charles I., 2001. "Was an Industrial Revolution Inevitable? Economic Growth Over the Very Long Run," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 1(2), pages 1-45, August.
    10. Sandberg, Lars G., 1979. "The Case of the Impoverished Sophisticate: Human Capital and Swedish Economic Growth before World War I," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 39(01), pages 225-241, March.
    11. Cervellati, Matteo & Sunde, Uwe, 2002. "Human Capital Formation, Life Expectancy and the Process of Economic Development," IZA Discussion Papers 585, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521452700 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Olsson, Ola, 2000. " Knowledge as a Set in Idea Space: An Epistemological View on Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 253-75, September.
    14. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521459556 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Maristella Botticini & Zvi Eckstein, 2005. "From Farmers to Merchants:A Human Capital Interpretation of Jewish Economic History," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2005-018, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    16. Stanley Reiter, 1992. "Knowledge, Discovery and Growth," Discussion Papers 1011, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
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