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Skills and the Pattern of Migration: The Role of Qualitative and Quantitative Restrictions on International Labor Mobility

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  • Djajic, Slobodan

Abstract

This paper develops a two-country model of international migration in an attempt to study the role of both qualitative and quantitative restrictions on international labor mobility. Individuals are distinguished in terms of their ability and age, enabling the model to examine factors that influence the age and skill profile of those who migrate, as well as the equilibrium flow of migrants and the pattern of factor rewards in the two economies. Effects of changes in certain parameters of the model are related to the nature of the immigration policy enforced by the host country. The role of emigration restrictions is also considered. Copyright 1989 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

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  • Djajic, Slobodan, 1989. "Skills and the Pattern of Migration: The Role of Qualitative and Quantitative Restrictions on International Labor Mobility," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(4), pages 795-809, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:30:y:1989:i:4:p:795-809
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:izamig:v:8:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1186_s40176-017-0111-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Michael Ben-Gad, 2008. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and the Immigration Surplus," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(2), pages 335-365, April.
    3. Bivins, Laura L. & Krishna, Kala, 2003. "Transferability of migration licences and the distribution of potential rents," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 323-328, September.
    4. P. Giannoccolo, 2004. "The Brain Drain. A Survey of the Literature," Working Papers 526, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    5. Stark, Oded & Casarico, Alessandra & Devillanova, Carlo & Uebelmesser, Silke, 2012. "On the formation of international migration policies when no country has an exclusive policy-setting say," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 420-429.
    6. Bucovetsky, S., 2003. "Efficient migration and redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(11), pages 2459-2474, October.
    7. Olof Ejermo & Yannu Zheng, 2018. "Liberalization of European migration and the immigration of skilled people to Sweden," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 8(1), pages 1-25, December.
    8. Dustmann, Christian & Fadlon, Itzhak & Weiss, Yoram, 2011. "Return migration, human capital accumulation and the brain drain," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 58-67, May.
    9. Eliakim Katz & Hillel Rapoport, 2001. "Macroeconomic Instability, Migration, and the Option Value of Education," Working Papers 2001-17, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.

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