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The Effects of Avian Influenza News on Consumer Purchasing Behavior: A Case Study of Italian Consumers' Retail Purchases

Author

Listed:
  • Beach, Robert H.
  • Kuchler, Fred
  • Leibtag, Ephraim S.
  • Zhen, Chen

Abstract

To better understand how information about potential health hazards influences food demand, this case study examines consumers’ responses to newspaper articles on avian influenza, informally referred to as bird flu. The focus here is on the response to bird flu information in Italy as news about highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza (HPAI H5N1) unfolded in the period October 2004 through October 2006, beginning after reports of the first outbreaks in Southeast Asia and extending beyond the point at which outbreaks were reported in Western Europe. Estimated poultry demand, as influenced by the volume of newspaper reports on bird flu, reveals the magnitude and duration of newspaper articles’ impacts on consumers’ food choices. Larger numbers of bird flu news reports led to larger reductions in poultry purchases. Most impacts were of limited duration, and all began to diminish within 5 weeks.

Suggested Citation

  • Beach, Robert H. & Kuchler, Fred & Leibtag, Ephraim S. & Zhen, Chen, 2008. "The Effects of Avian Influenza News on Consumer Purchasing Behavior: A Case Study of Italian Consumers' Retail Purchases," Economic Research Report 56477, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:56477
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/56477
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    8. L. Fanelli & M. Mazzocchi, 2002. "A cointegrated VECM demand system for meat in Italy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(13), pages 1593-1605.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hassouneh, Islam & Radwan, Amr & Serra, Teresa & Gil, José M., 2012. "Food scare crises and developing countries: The impact of avian influenza on vertical price transmission in the Egyptian poultry sector," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 264-274.
    2. Beach, Robert H. & Zhen, Chen, 2008. "Consumer Purchasing Behavior in Response to Media Coverage of Avian Influenza," 2008 Annual Meeting, February 2-6, 2008, Dallas, Texas 6750, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Santiago Guerrero, 2012. "Who is Selling You Chiquilitros of Gasoline? Evidence From a Public Disclosure Policy," Working Papers 2012-04, Banco de México.
    4. Hsu, Jane Lu & Liu, Kang Ernest & Lee, Hwang-Jaw & Huang, Min-Hsin & Hung, Kelsey Jing-Ru, 2010. "The Influences Of Avian Influenza, Bse, And H1n1 Influenza On Attitudinal Changes In Meat Safety Issues," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116405, European Association of Agricultural Economists;Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. repec:oup:revage:v:31:y:2009:i:4:p:734-750. is not listed on IDEAS

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