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Forest Management Decentralization in Kenya: Effects on Household Farm Forestry Decisions in Kakamega

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  • Ogada, Maurice Juma

Abstract

This study investigates the factors that influence participation of households in devolved system of forest management by joining community forest associations (CFA). It further employs Propensity Score Matching (PSM) to measure the impact of household’s participation in CFA on farm forestry decisions. The analysis uses cross-sectional data from a survey of Kakamega forest communities in Kenya in 2010. Generally, our findings reveal that participation in CFA by households is influenced broadly by socio-economic and institutional factors, and that participation in CFA has a positive impact on farm forestry development. Policy makers and development practitioners, therefore, need to devise, implement and sufficient fund interventions that would promote development of community forest associations with the ultimate goal of increasing forest cover in the country.

Suggested Citation

  • Ogada, Maurice Juma, 2012. "Forest Management Decentralization in Kenya: Effects on Household Farm Forestry Decisions in Kakamega," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126319, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126319
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    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics; Environmental Economics and Policy; Farm Management; Institutional and Behavioral Economics; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

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