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Household Tree Planting in Tigrai, Northern Ethiopia: Tree Species, Purposes, and Determinants


  • Gebreegziabher, Zenebe
  • Mekonnen, Alemu
  • Kassie, Menale
  • Köhlin, Gunnar


Trees have multiple purposes in rural Ethiopia, providing significant economic and ecological benefits. Planting trees supplies rural households with wood products for their own consumption, as well for sale, and decreases soil degradation. We used cross-sectional household-level data to analyze the determinants of household tree planting and explored the most important tree attributes or purpose(s) that enhance the propensity to plant trees. We set up a sample selection framework that simultaneously took into account the two decisions of tree growers (whether or not to plant trees and how many) to analyze the determinants of tree planting. We used logistic regression to analyze the most important tree attributes that contribute to households’ tree-planting decisions. We found that land size, age, gender, tenure security, education, exogenous income, and agro-ecology increased both the propensity to plant trees and the amount of tree planting, while increased livestock holding impacted both decisions negatively. Our findings also suggested that households consider a number of attributes in making the decision to plant trees. These results can be used by policymakers to promote tree planting in the study area by trengthening tenure security and considering households’ selection of specific tree species for their attributes.

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  • Gebreegziabher, Zenebe & Mekonnen, Alemu & Kassie, Menale & Köhlin, Gunnar, 2010. "Household Tree Planting in Tigrai, Northern Ethiopia: Tree Species, Purposes, and Determinants," Discussion Papers dp-10-01-efd, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-10-01-efd

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Hansen, J.D. & Luckert, M.K. & Minae, S. & Place, F., 2005. "Tree planting under customary tenure systems in malawi: impacts of marriage and inheritance patterns," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 99-118, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sidibé, Amadou, 2010. "Demand for soil, water and forest conservation in Burkina Faso," Department of Forest Economics publications 2345, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of forest economics.
    2. Kabbashi M. Suliman, 2013. "Factors Affecting the Choice of Households’ Primary Cooking Fuel in Sudan," Working Papers 760, Economic Research Forum, revised Jun 2013.
    3. Ogada, Maurice Juma, 2012. "Forest Management Decentralization in Kenya: Effects on Household Farm Forestry Decisions in Kakamega," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126319, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Mekonnen, Alemu & Damte, Abebe, 2011. "Private Trees as Household Assets and Determinants of Tree-Growing Behavior in Rural Ethiopia," Discussion Papers dp-11-14-efd, Resources For the Future.
    5. Faße, Anja & Grote, Ulrike, 2013. "The economic relevance of sustainable agroforestry practices — An empirical analysis from Tanzania," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 86-96.

    More about this item


    tree plantin; tree species; tree attributes or purposes; sample selection; Tigrai; Ethiopia;

    JEL classification:

    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q23 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Forestry
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy

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