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Compulsory versus Voluntary Insurance: An Online Experiment

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  • Zhang, Peilu
  • Palma, Marco A.

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  • Zhang, Peilu & Palma, Marco A., 2018. "Compulsory versus Voluntary Insurance: An Online Experiment," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274047, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea18:274047
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    11. Hongbin Cai & Yuyu Chen & Hanming Fang & Li-An Zhou, 2015. "The Effect of Microinsurance on Economic Activities: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(2), pages 287-300, May.
    12. Paolo Crosetto & Antonio Filippin, 2013. "The “bomb” risk elicitation task," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages 31-65, August.
    13. Ruth Hill & Angelino Viceisza, 2012. "A field experiment on the impact of weather shocks and insurance on risky investment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 15(2), pages 341-371, June.
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    15. Jeffrey R. Brown & Amy Finkelstein, 2008. "The Interaction of Public and Private Insurance: Medicaid and the Long-Term Care Insurance Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 1083-1102, June.
    16. Ann-Renée Blais & Elke U. Weber, 2006. "A Domain-Specific Risk-Taking (DOSPERT) scale for adult populations," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 1, pages 33-47, July.
    17. Kazuhiko Sakai & Mahito Okura, 2012. "An Economic Analysis of Compulsory and Voluntary Insurance," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 2(2), pages 1-8, April.
    18. Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Bernard Salanie, 2000. "Testing for Asymmetric Information in Insurance Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(1), pages 56-78, February.
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    26. Sepehri, Ardeshir & Simpson, Wayne & Sarma, Sisira, 2006. "The influence of health insurance on hospital admission and length of stay--The case of Vietnam," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(7), pages 1757-1770, October.
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    29. Finkelstein, Amy, 2004. "The interaction of partial public insurance programs and residual private insurance markets: evidence from the US Medicare program," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 1-24, January.
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    31. Dean Karlan & Ed Kutsoati & Margaret McMillan & Chris Udry, 2011. "Crop Price Indemnified Loans for Farmers: A Pilot Experiment in Rural Ghana," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 78(1), pages 37-55, March.
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    Keywords

    Experimental Economics; Risk and Uncertainty; Behavioral & Institutional Economics;

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