IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pso327.html
   My authors  Follow this author

John P. Sophocleus

Personal Details

First Name:John
Middle Name:P.
Last Name:Sophocleus
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pso327
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Auburn University Auburn, AL 36849-5242
334-844-2989
Terminal Degree:1989 John E. Walker Department of Economics; Clemson University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Auburn University

Auburn, Alabama (United States)
http://cla.auburn.edu/economics/

: (334) 844-4910
(334) 844-4615
0326 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849-5049
RePEc:edi:deaubus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. David Laband & Ram Pandit & John Sophocleus & Anne Laband, 2009. "Patriotism, pigskins, and politics: an empirical examination of expressive behavior and voting," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 138(1), pages 97-108, January.
  2. David N. Laband & John P. Sophocleus, 1992. "An Estimate of Resource Expenditures on Transfer Activity in the United States," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 959-983.
  3. David Laband & John Sophocleus, 1988. "The social cost of rent-seeking: First estimates," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 58(3), pages 269-275, September.
  4. David Laband & John Sophocleus, 1985. "Revealed preference for economics journals: Citations as dollar votes," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 317-324, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. David Laband & Ram Pandit & John Sophocleus & Anne Laband, 2009. "Patriotism, pigskins, and politics: an empirical examination of expressive behavior and voting," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 138(1), pages 97-108, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Richard Cebula & Franklin Mixon, 2012. "Dodging the vote?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 325-343, February.
    2. Barton, Jared & Rodet, Cortney, 2015. "Are political statements only expressive? An experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 174-186.
    3. R. Urbatsch, 2012. "The paradox of voting intelligently," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(3), pages 511-524, March.
    4. Hillman, Arye L., 2010. "Expressive behavior in economics and politics," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 403-418, December.
    5. Hamlin, Alan & Jennings, Colin, 2011. "Expressive Political Behaviour: Foundations, Scope and Implications," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(03), pages 645-670, July.
    6. Arenas, Andreu, 2016. "Sticky votes," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PA), pages 12-25.
    7. Steve Sauerwald & J. (Hans) Van Oosterhout & Marc Van Essen, 2016. "Expressive Shareholder Democracy: A Multilevel Study of Shareholder Dissent in 15 Western European Countries," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(4), pages 520-551, June.

  2. David N. Laband & John P. Sophocleus, 1992. "An Estimate of Resource Expenditures on Transfer Activity in the United States," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 959-983.

    Cited by:

    1. Rowley, Charles K., 2000. "Political culture and economic performance in sub-Saharan Africa," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 133-158, March.
    2. Robert Tollison, 2012. "The economic theory of rent seeking," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 152(1), pages 73-82, July.
    3. Ian Ayres & Steven D. Levitt, 1998. "Measuring Positive Externalities from Unobservable Victim Precaution: An Empirical Analysis of Lojack," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(1), pages 43-77.
    4. Stergios Skaperdas & Samarth Vaidya, 2007. "Persuasion as a Contest," CESifo Working Paper Series 2160, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Van Long, Ngo, 2013. "The theory of contests: A unified model and review of the literature," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 161-181.
    6. Kahana, Nava & Klunover, Doron, 2014. "Rent seeking and the excess burden of taxation," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 158-167.
    7. Richard L. Carson, 2009. "The Effect of Rent Seeking on Economics Growth," Carleton Economic Papers 09-10, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised 19 Dec 2016.
    8. Angelopoulos, Konstantinos & Philippopoulos, Apostolis & Vassilatos, Vanghelis, 2009. "The social cost of rent seeking in Europe," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 280-299, September.
    9. Josten, Stefan Dietrich, 2003. "Inequality, Crime and Economic Growth: A Classical Argument for Distributional Equality," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 10(4), pages 435-452, August.
    10. Lott, John R, Jr, 2000. "A Simple Explanation for Why Campaign Expenditures Are Increasing: The Government Is Getting Bigger," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(2), pages 359-393, October.
    11. Uppal, Yogesh, 2009. "Does legislative turnover adversely affect state expenditure policy? Evidence from Indian state elections," MPRA Paper 15657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Roman M. Sheremeta, 2016. "Impulsive Behavior in Competition: Testing Theories of Overbidding in Rent-Seeking Contests," Working Papers 16-21, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    13. Ana Rodríguez-Álvarez & Ignacio Rosal & José Baños-Pino, 2007. "The cost of strikes in the Spanish mining sector: modelling an undesirable input with a distance function," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 73-83, February.
    14. Ann Dryden Witte & Robert Witt, 2001. "What We Spend and What We Get: Public and Private Provision of Crime Prevention," NBER Working Papers 8204, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Wärneryd, Karl, 2001. "Information in conflicts
      [Information in Konflikten]
      ," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Market Processes and Governance FS IV 01-11, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    16. Kahana, Nava & Klunover, Doron, 2014. "Rent Seeking and the Excess Burden of Taxation," IZA Discussion Papers 8160, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Richard L. Carson, 2009. "Rent Seeking and Inclusiveness," Carleton Economic Papers 09-05, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised 19 Dec 2016.

  3. David Laband & John Sophocleus, 1988. "The social cost of rent-seeking: First estimates," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 58(3), pages 269-275, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Antoine Gentier & Giuseppina Gianfreda & Nathalie Janson, 2006. "The Question of the Rent Dissipation in the Notes Issuance Activity: The Case of the Italian Banking System before the Creation of the Bank of Italy," CAE Working Papers 45, Aix-Marseille Université, CERGAM.
    2. Antoine Gentier & Giuseppina Gianfreda & Nathalie Janson, 2011. "Rent Dissipation or Government Predation? The Notes Issuance Activity in Italy 1865-1882," CAE Working Papers 88, Aix-Marseille Université, CERGAM.
    3. Nasir Iqbal & Vince Daly, 2013. "Rent Seeking Opportunities and Economic Growth in Transitional Economies," PIDE-Working Papers 2013:87, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    4. Idrisov, Georgy & Ponomareva, Ekaterina, 2016. "Analysis of the Efficiency of Natural Monopolies in Russia," Working Papers 2041, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
    5. ISKAKOV, Mikhail & ISKAKOV, Alexey & ZAKHAROV, Alexey, 2014. "Equilibria in secure strategies in the Tullock contest," CORE Discussion Papers 2014010, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    6. Douglas Davis & Robert Reilly, 1998. "Do too many cooks always spoil the stew? An experimental analysis of rent-seeking and the role of a strategic buyer," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 95(1), pages 89-115, April.
    7. Constantin Sonin, 2000. "Private Protection of Property Rights, Inequality, and Economic Growth in Transition Economies," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1300, Econometric Society.
    8. Jeroen C.J.M. van den Bergh, 2007. "Abolishing GDP," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-019/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Russell Sobel & J. Clark & Dwight Lee, 2007. "Freedom, barriers to entry, entrepreneurship, and economic progress," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 20(4), pages 221-236, December.
    10. Sonin, Konstantin, 1999. "Inequality, Property Rights Protection, and Economic Growth in Transition Economies: Theory and Russian Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 2300, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. John Boatright, 2009. "Rent Seeking in a Market with Morality: Solving a Puzzle About Corporate Social Responsibility," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 88(4), pages 541-552, October.
    12. Lott, John R, Jr, 2000. "A Simple Explanation for Why Campaign Expenditures Are Increasing: The Government Is Getting Bigger," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(2), pages 359-393, October.
    13. Aleksandar Vasilev, 2013. "On the cost of rent-seeking by government bureaucrats in a Real-Business-Cycle framework," Working Papers 2013_20, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    14. Garey Durden & Barry Elledge, 1993. "The Effect Of Government Size On Economic Growth: Evidence From Gross State Product Data," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 23(2), pages 183-190, Fall.
    15. Etienne Farvaque & Gael Lagadec, 2009. "Electoral Control when Policies are for Sale," CESifo Working Paper Series 2522, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. Georgy Idrisov, 2016. "Towards modern industrial policy for Russia," Research Paper Series, Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, issue 169P, pages 157-157.
    17. Alexei Izyumov & John Vahaly, 2014. "Rent-Based Exploitation: Top, Bottom and Horizontal," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 74-81, February.
    18. Jac C. Heckelman, 2017. "Tullock on the organization of scientific inquiry," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 1-17, March.

  4. David Laband & John Sophocleus, 1985. "Revealed preference for economics journals: Citations as dollar votes," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 317-324, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Wohlrabe, 2016. "Taking the Temperature: A Meta-Ranking of Economics Journals," CESifo Working Paper Series 5726, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Sandra Rousseau, 2008. "Journal evaluation by environmental and resource economists: A survey," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 77(2), pages 223-233, November.
    3. Pedro Cosme da Costa Vieira, 2005. "A new economic journals’ ranking that takes into account the number of pages and co-authors," FEP Working Papers 189, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    4. Lúcia Paiva Martins de Sousa & Pedro Cosme da Costa Vieira, 2005. "Um ranking das revistas científicas especializadas em economia regional e urbana," FEP Working Papers 193, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    5. Pedro C. Vieira, 2004. "Top ranking economics journals impact variability and a ranking update to the year 2002," FEP Working Papers 149, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    6. Amanda H. Goodall & John M. McDowell & Larry D. Singell, 2017. "Do Economics Departments Improve after They Appoint a Top Scholar as Chairperson?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(4), pages 546-564, November.
    7. João Faria & Rajeev Goel, 2010. "Returns to networking in academia," Netnomics, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 103-117, July.
    8. Pedro Cosme Costa Vieira, 2004. "Statistical variability of top ranking economics journals impact," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(15), pages 945-948.
    9. João Ricardo Faria & Rajeev K. Goel, 2016. "Academic Publication Uncertainty and Publishing Behavior: A Game-Theoretic Perspective," CESifo Working Paper Series 6176, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Bornmann, Lutz & Butz, Alexander & Wohlrabe, Klaus, 2017. "What are the Top Five Journals in Economics? A New Meta–ranking," MPRA Paper 79176, University Library of Munich, Germany.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, John P. Sophocleus should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.