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Simon D. Angus

Personal Details

First Name:Simon
Middle Name:D.
Last Name:Angus
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pan478
http://tinyurl.com/MonashAngus

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Monash Business School
Monash University

Melbourne, Australia
http://business.monash.edu/economics
RePEc:edi:demonau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Klaus Ackermann & Simon D Angus & Paul A Raschky, 2017. "The Internet as Quantitative Social Science Platform: Insights from a Trillion Observations," Papers 1701.05632, arXiv.org.
  2. Newton, Jonathan & Wait, Andrew & Angus, Simon D., 2016. "Watercooler chat, organizational structure and corporate culture," Working Papers 2016-03, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
  3. Newton, Jonathan & Angus, Simon D., 2013. "Coalitions, tipping points and the speed of evolution," Working Papers 2013-02, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
  4. Wenli Cheng & Simon D. Angus, 2012. "The Cantillon Effect of Money Injection through Deficit Spending," Monash Economics Working Papers 12-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  5. Simon Angus & Virginie Masson, 2010. "The Effects of Information and Interactions on Contagion Processes," School of Economics Working Papers 2010-12, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
  6. Virginie Masson & Simon Angus, 2009. "What Matters Most: Information or Interaction? The Importance of Behavioral Rules on Network Effects for Contagion Processes," School of Economics Working Papers 2009-35, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.

Articles

  1. Newton, Jonathan & Angus, Simon D., 2015. "Coalitions, tipping points and the speed of evolution," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 172-187.
  2. Simon Angus & Behrooz Hassani-Mahmooei, 2015. ""Anarchy" Reigns: A Quantitative Analysis of Agent-Based Modelling Publication Practices in JASSS, 2001-2012," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 18(4), pages 1-16.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Newton, Jonathan & Wait, Andrew & Angus, Simon D., 2016. "Watercooler chat, organizational structure and corporate culture," Working Papers 2016-03, University of Sydney, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Jiabin Wu, 2019. "Social connections and cultural heterogeneity," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 779-798, April.
    2. Jonathan Newton, 2018. "Evolutionary Game Theory: A Renaissance," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-67, May.

  2. Newton, Jonathan & Angus, Simon D., 2013. "Coalitions, tipping points and the speed of evolution," Working Papers 2013-02, University of Sydney, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Newton, Jonathan & Sercombe, Damian, 2020. "Agency, potential and contagion," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 79-97.
    2. Sung-Ha Hwang & Jonathan Newton, 2017. "Payoff-dependent dynamics and coordination games," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 64(3), pages 589-604, October.
    3. Jonathan Newton, 2019. "Agency Equilibrium," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(1), pages 1-15, March.
    4. Rusch, Hannes, 2019. "The evolution of collaboration in symmetric 2×2-games with imperfect recognition of types," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 118-127.
    5. Newton, Jonathan & Wait, Andrew & Angus, Simon D., 2019. "Watercooler chat, organizational structure and corporate culture," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 354-365.
    6. Hwang, Sung-Ha & Lim, Wooyoung & Neary, Philip & Newton, Jonathan, 2016. "Conventional Contracts, Intentional behavior and Logit Choice: Equality Without Symmetry," Working Papers 2016-13, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    7. Newton, Jonathan & Angus, Simon D., 2015. "Coalitions, tipping points and the speed of evolution," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 172-187.
    8. Simon D Angus & Jonathan Newton, 2015. "Emergence of Shared Intentionality Is Coupled to the Advance of Cumulative Culture," PLOS Computational Biology, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(10), pages 1-12, October.
    9. Sawa, Ryoji & Wu, Jiabin, 2018. "Reference-dependent preferences, super-dominance and stochastic stability," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 96-104.
    10. Sanjeev Goyal & Pénélope Hernández & Guillem Martínez-Cánovas & Frédéric Moisan & Manuel Muñoz-Herrera & Ángel Sánchez, 2020. "Integration and diversity," Post-Print halshs-03051962, HAL.
    11. Bary S. R. Pradelski & Heinrich H. Nax, 2020. "Market sentiments and convergence dynamics in decentralized assignment economies," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 49(1), pages 275-298, March.
    12. Jonathan Newton, 2018. "Evolutionary Game Theory: A Renaissance," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-67, May.
    13. Newton, Jonathan, 2015. "Shared intentions: the evolution of collaboration," Working Papers 2015-05, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    14. Nax, Heinrich H. & Newton, Jonathan, 2019. "Risk attitudes and risk dominance in the long run," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 179-184.
    15. Philip R Neary & Jonathan Newton, 2017. "Heterogeneity in preferences and behavior in threshold models," The Journal of Mechanism and Institution Design, Society for the Promotion of Mechanism and Institution Design, University of York, vol. 2(1), pages 141-159, December.

  3. Simon Angus & Virginie Masson, 2010. "The Effects of Information and Interactions on Contagion Processes," School of Economics Working Papers 2010-12, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Alós-Ferrer & Simon Weidenholzer, 2010. "Imitation and the Role of Information in Overcoming Coordination Failures," Vienna Economics Papers 1008, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    2. Jonathan Newton, 2018. "Evolutionary Game Theory: A Renaissance," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-67, May.
    3. Cui, Zhiwei & Wang, Rui, 2016. "Collaboration in networks with randomly chosen agents," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 129-141.

Articles

  1. Newton, Jonathan & Angus, Simon D., 2015. "Coalitions, tipping points and the speed of evolution," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 172-187.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Simon Angus & Behrooz Hassani-Mahmooei, 2015. ""Anarchy" Reigns: A Quantitative Analysis of Agent-Based Modelling Publication Practices in JASSS, 2001-2012," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 18(4), pages 1-16.

    Cited by:

    1. Ju-Sung Lee & Tatiana Filatova & Arika Ligmann-Zielinska & Behrooz Hassani-Mahmooei & Forrest Stonedahl & Iris Lorscheid & Alexey Voinov & J. Gareth Polhill & Zhanli Sun & Dawn C. Parker, 2015. "The Complexities of Agent-Based Modeling Output Analysis," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 18(4), pages 1-4.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (2) 2010-07-10 2013-02-03
  2. NEP-NET: Network Economics (2) 2013-02-03 2017-01-29
  3. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (2) 2010-07-10 2013-02-03
  4. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2016-03-10
  5. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (1) 2012-04-03
  6. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2013-02-03
  7. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (1) 2012-04-03
  8. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2013-02-03
  9. NEP-ICT: Information & Communication Technologies (1) 2010-07-10
  10. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2012-04-03
  11. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2013-02-03
  12. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (1) 2012-04-03
  13. NEP-PAY: Payment Systems & Financial Technology (1) 2017-01-29
  14. NEP-SBM: Small Business Management (1) 2016-03-10

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