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The Cantillon Effect of Money Injection through Deficit Spending

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  • Wenli Cheng
  • Simon D. Angus

Abstract

This paper develops a simple dynamic model to study some of the implications of Cantillon’s insight that new money enters an economy at a specific point and that it takes time for the new money to permeate the economy. It applies a process analysis and uses numerical simulations to map out how the economy changes from one period to the next following a money injection. It finds that, within the region of stability, a money injection can generate oscillating changes in real variables for a considerably long period of time before converging back to the initial steady state. It also finds that a money injection benefits first recipients of the new money, but hurts later recipients and savers. Our simulation suggests that in our model savers can lose from a money injection even if they are first recipients of the new money.

Suggested Citation

  • Wenli Cheng & Simon D. Angus, 2012. "The Cantillon Effect of Money Injection through Deficit Spending," Monash Economics Working Papers 12-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2012-12
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    File URL: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/eco/research/papers/2012/1212cantilloneffectchengangus.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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