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Abdilahi Ali

Personal Details

First Name:Abdilahi
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ali
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pal833
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://scsee.org/

Affiliation

(90%) Salford Business School
University of Salford

Manchester, United Kingdom
http://www.business.salford.ac.uk/

: +44(0) 161 295 3206
+44 (0) 161 295 5992

RePEc:edi:desaluk (more details at EDIRC)

(10%) Somali Centre for Social and Economic Empowerment (SCSEE)

Mogadishu, Somalia
http://scsee.org/

:


RePEc:edi:scseeso (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Baris Alpaslan & Abdilahi Ali, 2016. "The spillover effects of innovative ideas on human capital," CAMA Working Papers 2016-59, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  2. Abdilahi Ali & Baris Alpaslan, 2013. "Do Migrant Remittances Complement Domestic Investment? New Evidence from Panel Cointegration," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1308, Economics, The University of Manchester.
  3. Abdilahi Ali & Katsushi S. Imai, 2013. "Crises, Economic Integration and Growth Collapses in African Countries," Discussion Paper Series DP2013-07, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
  4. Katsushi Imai & Raghav Gaiha & Ganesh Thapa & Abdilahi Ali, 2011. "Re-examination of supply response to changes in food commodity prices in Asian countries," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1113, Economics, The University of Manchester.
  5. Katsushi Imai & Raghav Gaiha & Abdilahi Ali & Nidhi Kaicker, 2011. "Remittances, Growth and Poverty: New Evidence from Asian Countries," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1125, Economics, The University of Manchester.

Articles

  1. Barış Alpaslan & Abdilahi Ali, 2018. "The spillover effects of innovative ideas on human capital," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 333-360, February.
  2. Abdilahi Ali & Baris Alpaslan, 2017. "Is There an Investment Motive Behind Remittances? Evidence From Panel Cointegration," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 51(1), pages 63-82, January-M.
  3. Abdilahi Ali & Katsushi S. Imai, 2015. "Editor's choice Crises, Economic Integration and Growth Collapses in African Countries," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 24(4), pages 471-501.
  4. Imai, Katsushi S. & Gaiha, Raghav & Ali, Abdilahi & Kaicker, Nidhi, 2014. "Remittances, growth and poverty: New evidence from Asian countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 524-538.
  5. Abdi Ali, 2013. "Are property rights institutions and financial development complements or substitutes? The case of private investment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1126-1131.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Baris Alpaslan & Abdilahi Ali, 2016. "The spillover effects of innovative ideas on human capital," CAMA Working Papers 2016-59, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Baris Alpaslan & King Yoong Lim & Yan Song, 2019. "The dynamics of health care and growth: A model with physician in dual practice," CAMA Working Papers 2019-05, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

  2. Abdilahi Ali & Baris Alpaslan, 2013. "Do Migrant Remittances Complement Domestic Investment? New Evidence from Panel Cointegration," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1308, Economics, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Elias K Shukralla, 2016. "Remittances, institutions and economic growth: a closer look at some proxies for institutions," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(1), pages 298-312.

  3. Abdilahi Ali & Katsushi S. Imai, 2013. "Crises, Economic Integration and Growth Collapses in African Countries," Discussion Paper Series DP2013-07, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.

    Cited by:

    1. A. Ovchinnikov & Z. Kozenko & M. Bichkov & V. Kabanov & A.Karpova, 2015. "Strategic Management of Sustainable Development of Agro – Industrial Complex with Economic Integration," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(3), pages 307-315.
    2. Ekpo Akpan & Chuku Chuku, 2017. "Working Paper 291 - Regional Financial Integration and Economic Activity in Africa," Working Paper Series 2403, African Development Bank.
    3. Niklas Potrafke, 2015. "The Evidence on Globalisation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(3), pages 509-552, March.
    4. Niklas Potrafke, 2014. "The Evidence on Globalization," CESifo Working Paper Series 4708, CESifo Group Munich.

  4. Katsushi Imai & Raghav Gaiha & Ganesh Thapa & Abdilahi Ali, 2011. "Re-examination of supply response to changes in food commodity prices in Asian countries," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1113, Economics, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Simrit Kaur, 2014. "Food entitlements, subsidies and right to food: a South Asian perspective," Chapters, in: Raghbendra Jha & Raghav Gaiha & Anil B. Deolalikar (ed.), Handbook on Food, chapter 19, pages 482-514, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Thapa, Ganesh & Gaiha, Raghav Gaiha, 2012. "Food Security in Asia and the Pacific: The Role of Smallholders," Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), vol. 9(1), pages 1-37, June.
    3. Mat Rahim, Siti Rohaya, 2014. "Asymmetric Cointegration: Barley and Crude Oil Price in United States," MPRA Paper 58447, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  5. Katsushi Imai & Raghav Gaiha & Abdilahi Ali & Nidhi Kaicker, 2011. "Remittances, Growth and Poverty: New Evidence from Asian Countries," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1125, Economics, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Chepel, S. & Bondarenko, K., 2015. "Is the External Labor Migration an Economic Growth Factor: Econometric Analysis and Policy Implications for the CIS Countries," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 142-166.
    2. Cazachevici, Alina & Havranek, Tomas & Horvath, Roman, 2019. "Remittances and Economic Growth: A Quantitative Survey," MPRA Paper 96823, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Syed Tehseen Jawaid & Syed Ali Raza, 2012. "Workers' remittances and economic growth in China and Korea: an empirical analysis," Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(3), pages 185-193, September.
    4. Imad El Hamma, 2017. "Do political institutions improve the effect of remittances on economic growth? Evidence from South-Mediterranean countries," Post-Print halshs-01655347, HAL.
    5. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan & Sherif Maher Hassan, 2016. "How does the Flow of Remittances Affect the Trade Balance of the Middle East and North Africa?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6172, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Nahed Zghidi & Zouheir Abid, 2015. "Remittances, Economic Freedom, and Economic Growth in North African Countries," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 18(58), pages 139-162, December.
    7. Jawaid, Syed Tehseen & Raza, Syed Ali, 2012. "Remittances, Growth and Convergence: Evidence from Developed and Developing Countries," MPRA Paper 39002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Njangang, Henri & Nembot Ndeffo, Luc & Noubissi Domguia, Edmond & Fosto Koyeu, Prevost, 2018. "The long-run and short-run effects of foreign direct investment, foreign aid and remittances on economic growth in African countries," MPRA Paper 89747, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Mohammad Salahuddin & Jeff Gow, 2015. "The relationship between economic growth and remittances in the presence of cross-sectional dependence," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(1), pages 207-221, January-M.
    10. Oluwasheyi S. Oladipo, 2020. "Migrant Workers' Remittances And Economic Growth: A Time Series Analysis," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 54(4), pages 75-88, October-D.
    11. Hamed SAMBO, 2018. "Understanding the effect of international remittances on undernourishment in Sub-Saharan Africa: A spatial model approach," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 47, pages 43-61.
    12. Rosemary E. Isoto & David S. Kraybill, 2017. "Remittances and household nutrition: evidence from rural Kilimanjaro in Tanzania," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(2), pages 239-253, April.
    13. Bresciani, F. & Imai, K.S. & Malaeb, B., 2017. "IFAD RESEARCH SERIES 15 - Remittances, growth and poverty reduction in Asia," IFAD Research Series 280053, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).
    14. Katsushi S. Imai & Bilal Malaeb & Fabrizio Bresciani, 2016. "Remittances, Growth and Poverty Reduction in Asia - A Critical Review of the Literature and the New Evidence from Cross-country Panel Data," Discussion Paper Series DP2016-28, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    15. Kristina Matuzeviciute & Mindaugas Butkus, 2016. "Remittances, Development Level, and Long-Run Economic Growth," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-20, December.
    16. Philip L. Martin, 2016. "Migration, Trade and Remittances: Low- and High-Skilled Workers," Remittances Review, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 1(1), pages 39-52, October.
    17. Wadim Strielkowski & Lenka Šperková & Brozyna Jacek, 2017. "Migration and Remittances Nexus: Economic Implications and Analysis," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 19(46), pages 772-772, August.
    18. Imtiaz Arif Lubna Khan Syed Ali Raza, 2018. "External Resources and Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis of South Asian Countries," Zagreb International Review of Economics and Business, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb, vol. 21(2), pages 1-17, November.
    19. Katsushi S. Imai & Bilal Malaeb, 2016. "Asia's Rural-urban Disparity in the Context of Growing Inequality," Discussion Paper Series DP2016-29, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    20. Imai, S.K. & Malaeb, B., 2018. "IFAD RESEARCH SERIES 27 - Asia’s rural-urban disparity in the context of growing inequality," IFAD Research Series 280076, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).
    21. Rezwana Rahman & Nurun Naher Moni, 2019. "Impact of International Remittances on Poverty in Bangladesh: Evidence from the Household Data," Remittances Review, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 4(1), pages 41-66, May.
    22. Opperman, Pieter & Adjasi, Charles Komla Delali, 2019. "Remittance volatility and financial sector development in sub-Saharan African countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 336-351.
    23. CHISTRUGA Boris & CRUDU Rodica, 2017. "Specifics Of Industrialization In Central And Eastern European Countries With Small Economy," Revista Economica, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 69(4), pages 53-67, November.
    24. Wadad Saad & Hassan Ayoub, 2019. "Remittances, Governance and Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from MENA Region," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 11(8), pages 1-1, August.
    25. Niaz Hussain Ghumro & Mohd Zaini Abd Karim, 2017. "The Role Of Remittances In The Stability Of Money Demand In Pakistan: A Cointegration Analysis," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 62(213), pages 45-66, April - J.
    26. Inoue, Takeshi, 2018. "Financial development, remittances, and poverty reduction: Empirical evidence from a macroeconomic viewpoint," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 59-68.
    27. Nasim Shah Shirazi & Sajid Amin Javed & Dawood Ashraf, 2018. "Remittances, Economic Growth and Poverty: A Case of African OIC Member Countries," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 57(2), pages 121-143.
    28. Hathroubi, Salem & Aloui, Chaker, 2016. "On interactions between remittance outflows and Saudi Arabian macroeconomy: New evidence from wavelets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 32-45.
    29. Yaya Keho, 2017. "Effect of remittances on household consumption in African and Asian countries: A quantile regression approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(3), pages 1753-1767.
    30. Ali M. Kutan & Yaz Gülnür Muradoğlu & Zhong Yu, 2016. "Worldwide impact of IMF policies during the Asian crisis: who does the IMF help, creditors or crisis countries?," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 116-147, June.
    31. Shahzad, Syed Jawad Hussain & Rehman, Mobeen Ur & Abbasi, Faiza & Zakaria, Muhammad, 2014. "Relationship between Remittance, Export, Foreign Direct Investment and Growth: A Panel Cointegration and Causal Analysis in South Asia," MPRA Paper 60290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    32. Musakwa, Mercy T & Odhiambo, Nicholas M, 2019. "Remittance and poverty nexus in Botswana: A multivariate approach," Working Papers 25749, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    33. Imad El Hamma, 2019. "Migrant Remittances and Economic Growth: The Role of Financial Development and Institutional Quality," Post-Print hal-01948169, HAL.
    34. El Hamma Imad, 2017. "Do political institutions improve the effect of remittances on economic growth? Evidence South-Mediterranean countries," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(3), pages 2133-2148.
    35. Metaxas, Theodore & Kechagia, Polyxeni, 2016. "Literature review of 100 empirical studies of Foreign Direct Investment: 1950-2015," MPRA Paper 71414, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    36. Nyasha, Sheilla & Odhiambo, Nicholas M, 2019. "Remittances and economic growth : Empirical evidence from South Africa," Working Papers 25744, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    37. Le Thanh Tung, 2018. "The Impact Of Remittances On Domestic Investment In Developing Countries: Fresh Evidence From The Asia-Pacific Region," Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies, Faculty of Economics, Vilnius University, vol. 9(2).
    38. Abdilahi Ali & Baris Alpaslan, 2017. "Is There an Investment Motive Behind Remittances? Evidence From Panel Cointegration," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 51(1), pages 63-82, January-M.
    39. Gloria Clarissa O. Dzeha, 2016. "The decipher, theory or empirics: a review of remittance studies," African Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(2), pages 113-134.
    40. Dassanayake, Wijaya & Luckert, Martin K. & Mohapatra, Sandeep, 2015. "Heterogeneity of household structures and income: Evidence from Zimbabwe and South Africa," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 668-692.
    41. Nahed Zghidi & Imen Mohamed Sghaier & Zouheir Abida, 2018. "Remittances, Institutions, and Economic Growth in North African Countries," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 9(3), pages 804-821, September.

Articles

  1. Barış Alpaslan & Abdilahi Ali, 2018. "The spillover effects of innovative ideas on human capital," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 333-360, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Abdilahi Ali & Katsushi S. Imai, 2015. "Editor's choice Crises, Economic Integration and Growth Collapses in African Countries," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 24(4), pages 471-501.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Imai, Katsushi S. & Gaiha, Raghav & Ali, Abdilahi & Kaicker, Nidhi, 2014. "Remittances, growth and poverty: New evidence from Asian countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 524-538.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Abdi Ali, 2013. "Are property rights institutions and financial development complements or substitutes? The case of private investment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1126-1131.

    Cited by:

    1. Simplice A Asongu, 2014. "On the substitution of institutions and finance in investment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(3), pages 1557-1574.
    2. Simplice Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2016. "Determinants of Property Rights Protection in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 16/041, African Governance and Development Institute..
    3. Asongu, Simplice A. & Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2015. "On the Empirics of Institutions and Quality of Growth: Evidence for Developing Countries," MPRA Paper 70233, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Asongu, Simplice & Batuo, Enowbi & Tchamyou, Vanessa, 2015. "Bundling Governance: Finance versus Institutions in Private Investment Promotion," MPRA Paper 71170, University Library of Munich, Germany.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (4) 2011-05-30 2011-11-28 2011-11-28 2013-06-09. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (3) 2011-11-28 2011-11-28 2013-06-09. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (2) 2011-11-28 2011-11-28. Author is listed
  4. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (2) 2013-03-16 2013-06-09. Author is listed
  5. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (2) 2011-11-28 2013-05-19. Author is listed
  6. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2013-03-16
  7. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2011-05-30
  8. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2016-09-25
  9. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2016-09-25
  10. NEP-KNM: Knowledge Management & Knowledge Economy (1) 2016-09-25
  11. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2011-05-30
  12. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2016-09-25
  13. NEP-SBM: Small Business Management (1) 2016-09-25

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