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Are property rights institutions and financial development complements or substitutes? The case of private investment

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  • Abdi Ali

    () (The University of Manchester, UK)

Abstract

This article explores whether the quality of the financial sector has an impact on the relationship between property rights institutions and private investment. Using dynamic panel techniques, we show that strong property rights promote increased private investment and that this positive effect is stronger in countries with poorer financial systems, suggesting that institutions and finance act as substitutes in their effect on investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdi Ali, 2013. "Are property rights institutions and financial development complements or substitutes? The case of private investment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1126-1131.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-13-00176
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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2013/Volume33/EB-13-V33-I2-P107.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice A Asongu, 2014. "On the substitution of institutions and finance in investment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(3), pages 1557-1574.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu & Joseph Nnanna & Vanessa S. Tchamyou, 2020. "Finance, Institutions and Private Investment in Africa," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 20/080, African Governance and Development Institute..
    3. Simplice A. Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2018. "Determinants of Property Rights Protection in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 9(4), pages 1291-1308, December.
    4. Asongu, Simplice & Batuo, Enowbi & Tchamyou, Vanessa, 2015. "Bundling Governance: Finance versus Institutions in Private Investment Promotion," MPRA Paper 71170, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Simplice A. Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2015. "On the Empirics of Institutions and Quality of Growth: Evidence for Developing Countries," Research Africa Network Working Papers 15/041, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    6. Ali, Abdilahi & Ali, Syed Imran, 2020. "Antecedents of the propensity to learn management practices and their impacts on firm outcomes in emerging markets: A Bayesian Model Averaging approach," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Property rights institutions; financial development and private investment;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment

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