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Panel evidence on finance, institutions and economic growth


  • Ryan Compton
  • Daniel Giedeman


This article investigates whether the level of institutional development affects the link between financial development and economic growth. Using a range of cross-sectional and panel approaches we find that the positive effect of banking development on growth is reduced as the level of institutions (e.g. rule of law, lack of corruption) increases. We do not, however, find a similar result when we examine the joint effect of institutional level and stock market development on economic growth. We attribute these results to the ability of banks to perform functions similar to those provided by well-operating institutions, whereas stock markets do not perform such comparable functions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ryan Compton & Daniel Giedeman, 2011. "Panel evidence on finance, institutions and economic growth," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(25), pages 3523-3547.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:43:y:2011:i:25:p:3523-3547
    DOI: 10.1080/00036841003670713

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandra Cepparulo & Juan Carlos Cuestas & Maurizio Intartaglia, 2017. "Financial development, institutions, and poverty alleviation: an empirical analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(36), pages 3611-3622, August.
    2. Ryan A. Compton & Bryan Paterson, 2016. "Military Spending and Growth: The Role of Institutions," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 301-322, June.
    3. Joshua C. Hall & Donald J. Lacombe & Timothy M. Shaughnessy, 2015. "Economic Freedom and Economic Growth Across U.S. States: A Spatial Panel Data Analysis," Working Papers 15-33, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    4. Hartwell, Christopher A., 2014. "The impact of institutional volatility on financial volatility in transition economies : a GARCH family approach," BOFIT Discussion Papers 6/2014, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    5. Mhamed ali Khemakhem & zouheir abida, 2016. "Institutions, Foreign Direct Investment, and Economic Growth in North African Countries," Proceedings of Business and Management Conferences 3405669, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    6. Effiong, Ekpeno, 2015. "Financial Development, Institutions and Economic Growth: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 66085, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. repec:cai:refaef:ecofi_127_0037 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eco:journ2:2017-05-19 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Compton, Ryan A. & Giedeman, Daniel C. & Hoover, Gary A., 2014. "A distributional analysis of the benefits of economic freedom," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 121-133.
    10. Tanin, Tauhidul Islam & Masih, Mansur, 2017. "Does economic freedom lead or lag economic growth? evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 79446, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Komivi Afawubo & Vincent Fromentin, 2013. "Financial development and economic growth: the case of ECOWAS and WAEMU," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1715-1722.
    12. Abdi Ali, 2013. "Are property rights institutions and financial development complements or substitutes? The case of private investment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1126-1131.
    13. Wang, Yuanyuan & You, Jing, 2012. "Corruption and firm growth: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 415-433.
    14. Farhadi, Minoo & Islam, Md. Rabiul & Moslehi, Solmaz, 2015. "Economic Freedom and Productivity Growth in Resource-rich Economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 109-126.

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