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Women in Politics: A New Instrument for Studying the Impact of Education on Growth

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  • Chen, Li-Ju

    (Dept. of Economics, Stockholm University)

Abstract

This paper tests the growth model of distance to the technological frontier, which states that the closer an economy is to the frontier, the higher the relative importance of innovation relative to imitation as a source of productivity growth. Hence, an economy closer to the technological frontier should invest more in skilled labor since innovation is a skill-intensive activity. I use the proportion of female legislators as an instrument for skilled labor, in contrast to Vandenbussche, Aghion, and Meghir (2006) who used lagged educational expenditures. The results with the new instrument are consistent with the theoretical prediction and the previous results of Vandenbussche, Aghion, and Meghir (2006).

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Li-Ju, 2009. "Women in Politics: A New Instrument for Studying the Impact of Education on Growth," Research Papers in Economics 2009:2, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sunrpe:2009_0002
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    distance to the technological frontier; women in politics;

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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