IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/psn14.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Donald L. Snyder

Personal Details

First Name:Donald
Middle Name:L.
Last Name:Snyder
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psn14

Affiliation

Department of Applied Economics
Utah State University

Logan, Utah (United States)
http://apec.usu.edu/

:


RePEc:edi:edusuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Barrett, Christopher B & Mohapatra, Sandeep & Snyder, Donald L, 1999. "The Dynamic Effects of U.S. Food Aid," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(4), pages 647-656, October.
  2. Snyder, Donald L. & Bhattacharyya, Rabindra N., 1990. "A more general dynamic economic model of the optimal rotation of multiple-use forests," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 168-175, March.
  3. Snyder, Donald L & Andersen, Jay C, 1988. "Competition for Water: The Issue of Native American Water Rights," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 22(0), pages 54-64, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Barrett, Christopher B & Mohapatra, Sandeep & Snyder, Donald L, 1999. "The Dynamic Effects of U.S. Food Aid," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(4), pages 647-656, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher B. Barrett, 2006. "Food Aid’s Intended and Unintended Consequences," Working Papers 06-05, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
    2. Suwa Eisenmann, Akiko & Verdier, Thierry, 2007. "Aid and Trade," CEPR Discussion Papers 6465, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Lentz, Erin C. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2008. "Improving Food Aid: What Reforms Would Yield the Highest Payoff?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1152-1172, July.
    4. Barrett, Christopher B., 2002. "Food Aid Effectiveness: "It'S The Targeting, Stupid!"," Working Papers 14754, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    5. Cardwell, Ryan T., 2008. "Food Aid and the WTO: Can New Rules Be Effective?," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 9(1).
    6. Abdulai, Awudu & Barrett, Christopher B. & Hazell, Peter, 2004. "Food aid for market development in Sub-Saharan Africa," DSGD discussion papers 5, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Marie-Francoise Calmette & Maureen Kilkenny, 2012. "Rural roads versus African famines," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 49(2), pages 373-396, October.
    8. Barrett, Christopher B. & Mohapatra, Sandeep & Snyder, Donald L., 1998. "The Dynamic Effects Of U.S. Food Aid," Economics Research Institute, ERI Study Papers 28362, Utah State University, Economics Department.
    9. Ferrière, Nathalie & Suwa-Eisenmann, Akiko, 2015. "Does Food Aid Disrupt Local Food Market? Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 114-131.
    10. Alix-Garcia, Jennifer & Walker, Sarah & Bartlett, Anne & Onder, Harun & Sanghi, Apurva, 2018. "Do refugee camps help or hurt hosts? The case of Kakuma, Kenya," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 66-83.
    11. Kiawu, James & Jones, Keithly G, 2013. "Implications of food aid and remittances for West African food import demand," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(1), July.
    12. Abdulai, Awudu & Barrett, Christopher B. & Hoddinott, John, 2005. "Does food aid Really have disincentive effects? New evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1689-1704, October.
    13. Janzen, Joseph, 2015. "The Effect of U.S. International Food Aid on Prices for Dry Peas and Lentils," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211797, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    14. Barrett, C. B. & Heisey, K. C., 2002. "How effectively does multilateral food aid respond to fluctuating needs?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 477-491.
    15. Barrett, Christopher B., 2002. "Food Aid And Commercial International Food Trade," Working Papers 14742, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    16. Titus O. Awokuse, 2006. "Assessing the Impact of Food Aid on Recipient Countries: A Survey," Working Papers 06-11, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).

  2. Snyder, Donald L. & Bhattacharyya, Rabindra N., 1990. "A more general dynamic economic model of the optimal rotation of multiple-use forests," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 168-175, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Erickson, Jon D. & Chapman, Duane & Fahey, Timothy J. & Christ, Martin J., 1997. "Nonrenewability in Forest Rotations: Implications for Economic and Ecosystem Sustainability," Working Papers 127837, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    2. Kjell Holmåker & Thomas Sterner, 1999. "Growth or environmental concern: which comes first? Optimal control with pure stock pollutants," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 2(3), pages 167-185, September.
    3. Burton, P-S, 1996. "Forestry Dynamics : A Forest-Level Analysis Allowing for Continuous Planting and Harvesting," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 96-01, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    4. Luis H. R. Alvarez & Erkki Koskela, 2003. "A General Approach to the Stochastic Rotation Problem with Amenity Valuation," CESifo Working Paper Series 857, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Cerdá, Emilio & Martín-Barroso, David, 2013. "Optimal control for forest management and conservation analysis in dehesa ecosystems," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 227(3), pages 515-526.
    6. Ariste, Ruolz & Lasserre, Pierre, 2001. "La gestion optimale d’une forêt exploitée pour son potentiel de diminution des gaz à effet de serre et son bois," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 77(1), pages 27-51, mars.
    7. Hampicke, Ulrich, 2001. "Remunerating nature conservation in central European forests: scope and limits of the Faustmann-Hartman approach," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 117-131, June.
    8. Kant, Shashi, 2000. "A dynamic approach to forest regimes in developing economies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 287-300, February.
    9. Centeno, Maria Luz N., 2000. "Deforestation In The Philippines: A Cge Modelling Approach," 2000 Conference (44th), January 23-25, 2000, Sydney, Australia 123619, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    10. Markku Ollikainen & Erkki Koskela, 2001. "Optimal Private and Public Harvesting under Spatial and Temporal Interdependence," CESifo Working Paper Series 452, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Erickson, Jon D. & Chapman, Duane & Fahey, Timothy J. & Christ, Martin J., 1999. "Non-renewability in forest rotations: implications for economic and ecosystem sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 91-106, October.
    12. Morag F. Macpherson & Adam Kleczkowski & John R. Healey & Nick Hanley, 2016. "Payment for Multiple Forest Benefits Alters the Effect of Tree Disease on Optimal Forest Rotation Length," Discussion Papers in Environment and Development Economics 2016-05, University of St. Andrews, School of Geography and Sustainable Development.
    13. Brown, J. Bradley, 2005. "Two-Part Tax Controls for Forest Density and Rotation Time," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19560, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    14. Newman, D.H., 2002. "Forestry's golden rule and the development of the optimal forest rotation literature," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 5-27.
    15. Gong, Peichen & Boman, Mattias & Mattsson, Leif, 2005. "Non-timber benefits, price uncertainty and optimal harvest of an even-aged stand," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 283-295, March.
    16. ERKKI Koskela & MARKKU Ollikainen, 1997. "Optimal Design of Forest Taxation with Multiple-Use Characteristics of Forest Stands," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 10(1), pages 41-62, July.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Donald L. Snyder should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.