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Implications of food aid and remittances for West African food import demand

  • Kiawu, James
  • Jones, Keithly G

The influence of food aid and remittances on West African food import demand is evaluated using a Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) model. Our results show that imports of oilseeds and the rest of the agricultural products category are highly price elastic, and that fruit and vegetables and dairy products are least responsive to price changes. Food aid did not influence West African food imports, but remittances were found to be statistically significant in determining food imports. The influence of remittances was particularly prominent in oilseed import demand.

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Article provided by African Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 08 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (July)

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Handle: RePEc:ags:afjare:156983
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