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Humanitarian Relief and Civil Conflict

  • Max Blouin
  • Stéphane Pallage

We examine the effects of famine relief efforts (food aid) in regions undergoing civil war. In our model, warlords seize a fraction of all aid entering the region. How much they loot affects their choice of army size; therefore the manner in which aid is delivered influences warfare. We identify a delivery plan for aid which minimizes total recruitment in equilibrium.

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Paper provided by CIRPEE in its series Cahiers de recherche with number 0706.

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Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:lvl:lacicr:0706
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  1. Abdulai, Awudu & Barrett, Christopher B. & Hoddinott, John, 2005. "Does food aid Really have disincentive effects? New evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1689-1704, October.
  2. Grossman, Herschel I, 1991. "A General Equilibrium Model of Insurrections," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 912-21, September.
  3. Max Blouin & Stéphane Pallage, 2007. "Addressing the Food Aid Curse," Cahiers de recherche 0717, CIRPEE.
  4. Sanjeev Gupta & Benedict Clements & Erwin R. Tiongson, 2004. "Foreign Aid and Consumption Smoothing: Evidence from Global Food Aid," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(3), pages 379-390, 08.
  5. Srinivasan, T N, 1989. "Food Aid: A Cause of Development Failure or an Instrument for Success?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 3(1), pages 39-65, January.
  6. Barrett, Christopher B, 2001. "Does Food Aid Stabilize Food Availability?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(2), pages 335-49, January.
  7. William Easterly, 2003. "Can Foreign Aid Buy Growth?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 23-48, Summer.
  8. Grossman, Herschel I, 1999. "Kleptocracy and Revolutions," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(2), pages 267-83, April.
  9. Hagen, Rune Jansen, 2006. "Samaritan agents? On the strategic delegation of aid policy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 249-263, February.
  10. Jayne, T. S. & Strauss, John & Yamano, Takashi & Molla, Daniel, 2001. "Giving to the Poor? Targeting of Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 887-910, May.
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