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Food aid allocation policies: coordination and responsiveness to recipient country needs

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  • Christian Kuhlgatz
  • Awudu Abdulai
  • Christopher B. Barrett

Abstract

We employ censored least absolute deviations and multivariate Tobit estimators to investigate whether food aid flows from the main donor countries respond to recipient country needs as reflected in low food availability, low income, or both. We also explore the hypothesis that donor countries specifically coordinate their food aid shipments to recipient countries. Our findings show that food aid in aggregate and from each donor is significantly targeted at poorer countries and is highly persistent over time. Food aid responses to food availability shortfalls, natural disasters, and violent conflicts are common but more modest and uneven across donors. Finally, we find strong evidence of donor coordination in food aid allocation. Copyright (c) 2010 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Kuhlgatz & Awudu Abdulai & Christopher B. Barrett, 2010. "Food aid allocation policies: coordination and responsiveness to recipient country needs," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(3-4), pages 319-327, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:41:y:2010:i:3-4:p:319-327
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    6. Linda M. Young & Philip C. Abbott, 2008. "Food Aid Donor Allocation Decisions After 1990," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 56(1), pages 27-50, March.
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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:9:p:1645-:d:112167 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Clarke, Daniel J. & Hill, Ruth Vargas, 2013. "Cost-benefit analysis of the african risk capacity facility:," IFPRI discussion papers 1292, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. van Dijk, Michiel, 2011. "What Factors Determine the Allocation of Aid to Agriculture?," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114827, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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