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Eric R. Jensen

Personal Details

First Name:Eric
Middle Name:R.
Last Name:Jensen
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pje64
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Illinois Wesleyan University

Bloomington, Illinois (United States)
http://titan.iwu.edu/~econ/

: (309) 556-3178
309-556-3719
Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL 61702-2900
RePEc:edi:deiwuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Dennis Ahlburg & Eric R. Jensen & Ruyan Liao, 2006. "When I'm 104: The Determinants Of Healthy Longevity among the Oldest-Old in China," Working Papers 34, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  2. Eric R. Jensen & Sarah M. Gale & Paul E. Charpentier, 2006. "On Migrant Selectivity," Working Papers 32, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.

Articles

  1. Eric R. Jensen, 2008. "Law, ethics, and craft skills," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 977-982.
  2. Eric Jensen & John Stewart, 2003. "Health facility characteristics and the decision to seek care," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 79-100.
  3. Eric Jensen & Dennis Ahlburg, 2002. "Family Size, Unwantedness, And Child Health And Health Care Utilisation In Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 43-59.
  4. Eric Jensen, 1996. "The fertility impact of alternative family planning distribution channels in Indonesia," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(2), pages 153-165, May.
  5. Jensen, Eric R, 1990. "An Econometric Analysis of the Old-Age Security Motive for Childbearing," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 31(4), pages 953-968, November.
  6. Eric Jensen, 1986. "A comment on glenn Firebaugh’s “population density and fertility”," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 23(2), pages 283-284, May.
  7. Eric Jensen, 1985. "Desired fertility, the “up to god” response, and sample selection bias," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(3), pages 445-454, August.
  8. George Simmons & Celeste Smucker & Stan Bernstein & Eric Jensen, 1982. "Post-neonatal mortality in Rural India: Implications of an economic model," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 19(3), pages 371-389, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Dennis Ahlburg & Eric R. Jensen & Ruyan Liao, 2006. "When I'm 104: The Determinants Of Healthy Longevity among the Oldest-Old in China," Working Papers 34, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.

    Cited by:

    1. Zeng Yi & Danan Gu & Kenneth Land, 2007. "The association of childhood socioeconomic conditions with healthy longevity at the oldest-old ages in China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(3), pages 497-518, August.

Articles

  1. Eric Jensen & Dennis Ahlburg, 2002. "Family Size, Unwantedness, And Child Health And Health Care Utilisation In Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 43-59.

    Cited by:

    1. Emily Smith-Greenaway & Christie Sennott, 2016. "Death and Desirability: Retrospective Reporting of Unintended Pregnancy After a Child’s Death," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 805-834, June.
    2. Kabir Dasgupta & Keisha T.-Solomon, 2017. "Family Size Effects on Child Health: Evidence on the Quantity-Quality Trade-off using the NLSY," Working Papers 2017-04 JEL Classificatio, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    3. Filmer, Deon & Friedman, Jed & Schady, Norbert, 2008. "Development, modernization, and son preference in fertility decisions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4716, The World Bank.

  2. Eric Jensen, 1996. "The fertility impact of alternative family planning distribution channels in Indonesia," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(2), pages 153-165, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher McKelvey & Duncan Thomas & Elizabeth Frankenberg, 2011. "Fertility Regulation in an Economic Crisis," Working Papers id:4449, eSocialSciences.
    2. Carranza, Eliana, 2012. "Islamic inheritance law, son preference and fertility behavior of Muslim couples in Indonesia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5972, The World Bank.
    3. Johar, Meliyanni, 2009. "The impact of the Indonesian health card program: A matching estimator approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 35-53, January.
    4. Mark Montgomery & Michele Gragnolati & Kathleen Burke & Edmundo Paredes, 2000. "Measuring living standards with proxy variables," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 37(2), pages 155-174, May.

  3. Jensen, Eric R, 1990. "An Econometric Analysis of the Old-Age Security Motive for Childbearing," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 31(4), pages 953-968, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Michele Boldrin & Larry E. Jones, 2002. "Mortality, Fertility, and Saving in a Malthusian Economy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(4), pages 775-814, October.
    2. K Blackburn & G P Cipriani, 2002. "Intergenerational Transfers and Demographic Transition," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 14, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    3. Mohamed Jellal & Francois-Charles Wolff, 2002. "Insecure old-age security," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(4), pages 636-648, October.
    4. Knoblauch, Vicki, 2000. "Lexicographic orders and preference representation," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 255-267, October.
    5. Alberto Basso & David Cuberes, 2013. "Fertility and Financial Development: Evidence from U.S. Counties in the 19th Century," Working Papers 2013011, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    6. KONDO Keisuke, 2015. "Does Agglomeration Discourage Fertility? Evidence from the Japanese General Social Survey 2000-2010," Discussion papers 15067, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    7. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 2004. "The pay-as-you-go pension system as fertility insurance and an enforcement device," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1335-1357, July.
    8. Kudo, Yuya, 2012. "Marriage as women's old age insurance : evidence from migration and land inheritance practices in rural Tanzania," IDE Discussion Papers 368, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    9. Marek Loužek, 2007. "Pension Reform in the Czech Republic - A Contribution into the Debate," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2007(1), pages 55-69.
    10. Uctum, Remzi, 2007. "Économétrie des modèles à changement de régimes : un essai de synthèse," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 83(4), pages 447-482, décembre.
    11. Luciano Fanti & Luca Gori, 2012. "Public Expenditure on Health and Private Old-Age Insurance in an OLG Growth Model with Endogenous Fertility: Chaotic Dynamics Under Perfect Foresight," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 40(4), pages 333-353, December.
    12. Santosh Mehrotra & Mario Biggeri, 2002. "Social Protection in the Informal Economy: Home based women workers and outsourced manufacturing in Asia," Papers inwopa02/24, Innocenti Working Papers.
    13. Vicki Knoblauch, 2003. "Continuous Lexicographic Preferences," Working papers 2003-31, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    14. Mun Lai, 2012. "When having many children pays: a case study from Taiwan," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 323-348, January.
    15. Grimm, Michael, 2016. "Rainfall Risk and Fertility: Evidence from Farm Settlements during the American Demographic Transition," IZA Discussion Papers 10351, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Anu Rammohan, 2000. "The Interaction of Child-labour and Schooling in Developing Countries: A Theoretical Perspective," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 85-99, December.
    17. Seebens, Holger, 2009. "The contribution of female non-farm income to poverty reduction," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51762, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    18. Hans-Werner Sinn, 1998. "The Pay-As-You-Go Pension System as a Fertility Insurance and Enforcement Device," NBER Working Papers 6610, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Luciano Fanti, 2012. "Endogenous labour supply, habits and aspirations," Discussion Papers 2012/144, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    20. Anu Rammohan, 2001. "Development of financial capital markets and the role of children as economic assets," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(1), pages 45-58.
    21. Morand, Olivier F, 1999. "Endogenous Fertility, Income Distribution, and Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 331-349, September.
    22. Grimm, Michael, 2017. "Rainfall risk, fertility and development: Evidence from farm settlements during the American demographic transition," Ruhr Economic Papers 718, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    23. Zhao Kai, 2011. "Social Security, Differential Fertility, and the Dynamics of the Earnings Distribution," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-31, August.

  4. Eric Jensen, 1985. "Desired fertility, the “up to god” response, and sample selection bias," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(3), pages 445-454, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Nistha Sinha, 2004. "Testing for a Supply Constraint to Fertility: Interpreting the Up to God Response to the Survey Question on Desired Family Size," Working Papers 889, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    2. Deborah DeGraff, 1991. "Increasing contraceptive use in Bangladesh: The role of demand and supply factors," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(1), pages 65-81, February.
    3. James McCarthy & Gbolahan Oni, 1987. "Desired family size and its determinants among urban Nigerian women: A two-stage analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 24(2), pages 279-290, May.
    4. John Sandberg, 2005. "The influence of network mortality experience on nonnumeric response concerning expected family size: Evidence from a Nepalese mountain village," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(4), pages 737-756, November.
    5. Ann Riley & Albert Hermalin & Luis Rosero-Bixby, 1993. "A new look at the determinants of nonnumeric response to desired family size: The case of Costa Rica," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(2), pages 159-174, May.

  5. George Simmons & Celeste Smucker & Stan Bernstein & Eric Jensen, 1982. "Post-neonatal mortality in Rural India: Implications of an economic model," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 19(3), pages 371-389, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Rohini Pande, 2003. "Selective gender differences in childhood nutrition and immunization in rural India: The role of siblings," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(3), pages 395-418, August.
    2. Bhalotra, Sonia & Attfield, Cliff, 1998. "Intrahousehold resource allocation in rural Pakistan: a semi-parametric analysis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6679, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Hu, Luojia & Schlosser, Analia, 2011. "Prenatal Sex Selection and Girls' Well-Being: Evidence from India," IZA Discussion Papers 5562, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Daniel Rosenblum, 2013. "The effect of fertility decisions on excess female mortality in India," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 147-180, January.
    5. Eric Jensen & Dennis Ahlburg, 2002. "Family Size, Unwantedness, And Child Health And Health Care Utilisation In Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 43-59.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CNA: China (1) 2006-08-12
  2. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2006-07-21
  3. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2006-08-12
  4. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (1) 2006-08-12

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