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Desired family size and its determinants among urban Nigerian women: A two-stage analysis

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  • James McCarthy
  • Gbolahan Oni

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • James McCarthy & Gbolahan Oni, 1987. "Desired family size and its determinants among urban Nigerian women: A two-stage analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 24(2), pages 279-290, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:24:y:1987:i:2:p:279-290 DOI: 10.2307/2061635
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ward, Michael P & Butz, William P, 1980. "Completed Fertility and Its Timing," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(5), pages 917-940, October.
    2. Eric Jensen, 1985. "Desired fertility, the “up to god” response, and sample selection bias," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(3), pages 445-454, August.
    3. M. Khan & Ismail Sirageldin, 1977. "Son preference and the demand for additional children in pakistan," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 14(4), pages 481-495, November.
    4. Lolagene Coombs & Dorothy Fernandez, 1978. "Husband-wife agreement about reproductive goals," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 15(1), pages 57-73, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sara Yeatman & Christie Sennott & Steven Culpepper, 2013. "Young Women’s Dynamic Family Size Preferences in the Context of Transitioning Fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(5), pages 1715-1737, October.
    2. Nistha Sinha, 2004. "Testing for a Supply Constraint to Fertility: Interpreting the Up to God Response to the Survey Question on Desired Family Size," Working Papers 889, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    3. Julia Behrman, 2015. "Does Schooling Affect Women’s Desired Fertility? Evidence From Malawi, Uganda, and Ethiopia," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(3), pages 787-809, June.

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