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Coverage of infertility treatment and fertility outcomes

Author

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  • Matilde Machado

    ()

  • Anna Sanz-de-Galdeano

    ()

Abstract

Policy interventions that increase insurance coverage for infertility treatments may affect fertility trends, and ultimately, population age structures. However, such policies have ignored the overall impact of coverage on fertility. We examine short-term and long-term effects of increased insurance coverage for infertility on the timing of first births and on women’s total fertility rates. Our main contribution is to show that infertility mandates enacted in the United States during the 80s and 90s did not increase the total fertility rates of women by the end of their reproductive lives. We also show evidence that these mandates induced women to put off motherhood. Copyright The Author(s) 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Matilde Machado & Anna Sanz-de-Galdeano, 2015. "Coverage of infertility treatment and fertility outcomes," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 407-439, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:series:v:6:y:2015:i:4:p:407-439
    DOI: 10.1007/s13209-015-0135-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Naomi Gershoni & Corinne Low, 2020. "The Power of Time: The Impact of Free IVF on Women’s Human Capital Investments," Working Papers 2011, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    2. Naomi Gershoni & Corinne Low, 2019. "Older Yet Fairer: How Extended Reproductive Time Horizons Reshaped Marriage Patterns In Israel," Working Papers 1913, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    3. Joelle Abramowitz, 2017. "Assisted Reproductive Technology and Women’s Timing of Marriage and Childbearing," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 100-117, March.
    4. Carlo Ciccarelli & Alberto Dalmazzo & Daniela Vuri, 2018. "Home Sweet Home: the Effect of Sugar Protectionism on Emigration in Italy, 1876-1913," CEIS Research Paper 437, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 08 Jun 2018.
    5. Janna Bergsvik & Agnes Fauske & Rannveig K. Hart, 2020. "Effects of policy on fertility. A systematic review of (quasi)experiments," Discussion Papers 922, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Assisted reproductive technologies; Infertility insurance mandates; Completed fertility; Delay of motherhood ; Synthetic control method; I18; J13;

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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