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Assisted reproductive technology and women’s choice to pursue professional careers

Author

Listed:
  • Sarah Kroeger

    () (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)

  • Giulia La Mattina

    () (University of South Florida)

Abstract

We examine the impact of assisted reproductive technology on women’s choice to pursue professional careers. We hypothesize that the availability of assisted reproductive technology increases the expected benefits of a professional degree by allowing women to delay childbearing in their 20s and 30s while establishing their careers, thereby reaping greater financial benefit from human capital investment. State-level timing differences in the enactment of laws which mandated infertility treatment coverage in employer-sponsored health plans allow us to exploit state, year, and cohort variation in women’s ages at the time the laws are passed. These insurance mandates dramatically increase access to assisted reproductive technology. Using a triple difference strategy, we find that a mandate to cover assisted reproductive technology does increase the probability that a woman chooses to invest in a professional degree and to work in a professional career.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Kroeger & Giulia La Mattina, 2017. "Assisted reproductive technology and women’s choice to pursue professional careers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(3), pages 723-769, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:30:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00148-016-0630-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-016-0630-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Naomi Gershoni & Corinne Low, 2019. "Older Yet Fairer: How Extended Reproductive Time Horizons Reshaped Marriage Patterns In Israel," Working Papers 1913, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Occupational choice; Insurance mandates; Fertility; Professional careers; Professional degrees; Assisted reproductive technology;

    JEL classification:

    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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