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The Impact of Women’s Health Clinic Closures on Fertility

Author

Listed:
  • Yao Lu

    (Analysis Group, Inc., 111 Huntington Avenue, 14th Floor, Boston, MA 02199)

  • David J.G. Slusky

    (Department of Economics, The University of Kansas;)

Abstract

The government of Texas recently enacted multiple restrictions and funding limitations on women’s health organizations that provide abortion services or are associated with those that do. These policies have caused numerous clinic closures throughout the state, drastically reducing access to care. We study the impact of these clinic closures on fertility by combining quarterly snapshots of health center addresses from a network of women's health centers with restricted geotagged data of all Texas birth certificates for 2007–2013. We calculate the driving distance to the nearest clinic for each ZIP code, and find that an increase of 100 miles to the nearest clinic results in a 1.2 percent increase in the birth rate. This increase is driven by fertility changes for unmarried women and those having their first or second child. It also reduces average maternal age.

Suggested Citation

  • Yao Lu & David J.G. Slusky, 2016. "The Impact of Women’s Health Clinic Closures on Fertility," WORKING PAPERS SERIES IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS 201607, University of Kansas, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:kan:wpaper:201607
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    File URL: http://www2.ku.edu/~kuwpaper/2016Papers/201607.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Sourafel Girma & David Paton, 2013. "Does Parental Consent for Birth Control Affect Underage Pregnancy Rates? The Case of Texas," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(6), pages 2105-2128, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Women’s Health; Family Planning; Abortion; Contraception; Birth Rate; Access; Restriction; Law; Texas;

    JEL classification:

    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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