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Will China's diet follow western diets?

Author

Listed:
  • Chizuru Shono

    (Department of Life Sciences, Seika Women's Junior College, 2-12-1, Minamihachiman, Hakata-ku, Fukuoka 816-8540, Japan)

  • Nobuhiro Suzuki

    (Department of Agricultural Economics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan)

  • Harry M. Kaiser

    (Department of Agricultural, Resource, and Managerial Economics, 349 Warren Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-7801)

Abstract

Whether China's diet will follow western diets or not is an important question in predicting the future world food shortage. To address this question, world dietary patterns were grouped using the principal component analysis. The results show that China's dietary pattern is indeed moving from the developing country group toward the developed country group, but its direction is not towards the U.S. China's dietary pattern is moving toward Asian developed countries' like Japan, Korea, and Hong Kong, who depend more on seafood as protein sources than the western countries. Meats are replaced partially with fish in these countries. Estimated expenditure elasticities of meats and seafood also support the above results. This is important to consider in predicting China's future meat and feed grain demand. [Econ-Lit citation: C100, O530, Q110] © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Suggested Citation

  • Chizuru Shono & Nobuhiro Suzuki & Harry M. Kaiser, 2000. "Will China's diet follow western diets?," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 271-279.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:16:y:2000:i:3:p:271-279
    DOI: 10.1002/1520-6297(200022)16:3<271::AID-AGR1>3.0.CO;2-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Huang, Jikun & Bouis, Howarth E., 1996. "Structural changes in the demand for food in Asia," 2020 vision briefs 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Brian J. Revell, 2015. "One Man's Meat … 2050? Ruminations on Future Meat Demand in the Context of Global Warming," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 573-614, September.
    2. Ma, Hengyun & Rae, Allan N., 2004. "Projections of Dairy Product Consumption and Trade Opportunities in China," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Department of Agriculture and Food Systems, vol. 12.
    3. Fengxia Dong & Frank Fuller, 2010. "Dietary Structural Change in China's Cities: Empirical Fact or Urban Legend?," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 58(1), pages 73-91, March.
    4. Gould, Brian W. & Dong, Diansheng, 2004. "Product Quality And The Demand For Food: The Case Of Urban China," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20010, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    5. Revell, Brian J., 2015. "One Man’s Meat…. 2050? Ruminations on future meat demand in the context of global warming," 89th Annual Conference, April 13-15, 2015, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 204205, Agricultural Economics Society.
    6. Yen, Steven T. & Fang, Cheng & Su, Shew-Jiuan, 2004. "Household food demand in urban China: a censored system approach," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 564-585, September.
    7. Liu, Hongbo & Parton, Kevin A. & Zhou, Zhang-Yue & Cox, Rod, 2009. "At-home meat consumption in China: an empirical study," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(4), pages 1-17.
    8. Curtis, Kynda R. & McCluskey, Jill J. & Wahl, Thomas I., 2007. "Consumer preferences for western-style convenience foods in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-14.
    9. Hongbo Liu & Kevin A. Parton & Zhang-Yue Zhou & Rod Cox, 2009. "At-home meat consumption in China: an empirical study ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(4), pages 485-501, October.
    10. Aguero, Jorge M. & Gould, Brian W., 2003. "A Household Level Analysis of Food Expenditure Patterns in Urban China: 1995-2000," Discussion Papers 37598, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Babcock Institute for International Dairy Research and Development.

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