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The Demand for Spatially Complementary National Parks

  • Kevin E. Henrickson
  • Erica H. Johnson

Using a panel dataset on annual visits to each U.S. national park, we empirically analyze the demand for these parks using a spatial lag model, which accounts for the complementary nature of the parks. Our results suggest that increases in fuel costs, temperature increases of greater than 3 °F, and restrictions on foreign tourism all lower visitation to U.S. national parks, causing associated decreases in money spent by tourists, jobs created, and income generated. These results can also be used to analyze the possible implications of proposed public policies, such as international visa requirements, gas taxes, and carbon taxing/trading.

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Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

Volume (Year): 89 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 330-345

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:89:y:2013:ii:1:p:330-345
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  1. Joris Pinkse & Margaret E. Slade & Craig Brett, 2002. "Spatial Price Competition: A Semiparametric Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(3), pages 1111-1153, May.
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  6. Ngure, Njoroge & Chapman, Duane, 1999. "Demand for Visitation to U.S. National Park Areas: Entrance Fees and Individual Area Attributes," Working Papers 127698, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  7. Kevin E. Henrickson, 2012. "Spatial Competition And Strategic Firm Relocation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(2), pages 364-379, 04.
  8. Peter C. Reiss & Matthew W. White, 2005. "Household Electricity Demand, Revisited," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(3), pages 853-883.
  9. Richardson, Robert B. & Loomis, John B., 2004. "Adaptive recreation planning and climate change: a contingent visitation approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1-2), pages 83-99, September.
  10. John R. McKean & Donn M. Johnson & Richard G. Walsh, 1995. "Valuing Time in Travel Cost Demand Analysis: An Empirical Investigation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 71(1), pages 96-105.
  11. Lisa C. Chase & David R. Lee & William D. Schulze & Deborah J. Anderson, 1998. "Ecotourism Demand and Differential Pricing of National Park Access in Costa Rica," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(4), pages 466-482.
  12. Robert Mendelsohn & John Hof & George Peterson & Reed Johnson, 1992. "Measuring Recreation Values with Multiple Destination Trips," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 74(4), pages 926-933.
  13. Parsons, George R. & Wilson, Aaron J., 1997. "Incidental And Joint Consumption In Recreation Demand," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 26(1), April.
  14. Arturs Kalnins, 2003. "Hamburger Prices and Spatial Econometrics," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(4), pages 591-616, December.
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