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Testing Significance Of Multi-Destination And Multi-Purpose Trip Effects In A Travel Cost Method Demand Model For Whale Watching Trips

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  • Loomis, John B.
  • Yorizane, Shizuka
  • Larson, Douglas M.

Abstract

Inclusion of multi-destination and multi-purpose visitors has an appreciable influence on a standard count data travel cost model derived estimate of willingness to pay but the differences are not statistically significant. We adapt a more general travel cost model (TCM) of Parsons and Wilson (1997) that allows for inclusion of multi-destination visitors as incidental demand to allow estimation of an unbiased measure of single and multi-destination willingness to pat for whale viewing using a single pooled equation. The primary purpose trip values from the standard TCM and simple generalized TCM model are identical at $43 per person per day and neither are significantly different from the $50 day value from a generalized model that distinguishes between joint and incidental trips. The general models avoid underestimation of total recreation site benefits that would result from omitting the consumer surplus of multi-destination visitors.

Suggested Citation

  • Loomis, John B. & Yorizane, Shizuka & Larson, Douglas M., 2000. "Testing Significance Of Multi-Destination And Multi-Purpose Trip Effects In A Travel Cost Method Demand Model For Whale Watching Trips," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 29(2), October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:31308
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth E. McConnell & Ivar Strand, 1981. "Measuring the Cost of Time in Recreation Demand Analysis: An Application to Sportfishing," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 63(1), pages 153-156.
    2. Parsons, George R. & Wilson, Aaron J., 1997. "Incidental And Joint Consumption In Recreation Demand," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 26(1), April.
    3. Daniel M. Hellerstein, 1991. "Using Count Data Models in Travel Cost Analysis with Aggregate Data," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 73(3), pages 860-866.
    4. Robert Mendelsohn & John Hof & George Peterson & Reed Johnson, 1992. "Measuring Recreation Values with Multiple Destination Trips," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 74(4), pages 926-933.
    5. Daniel Hellerstein & Robert Mendelsohn, 1993. "A Theoretical Foundation for Count Data Models," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 75(3), pages 604-611.
    6. V. Kerry Smith & Raymond J. Kopp, 1980. "The Spatial Limits of the Travel Cost Recreational Demand Model," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 56(1), pages 64-72.
    7. Abraham E. Haspel & F. Reed Johnson, 1982. "Multiple Destination Trip Bias in Recreation Benefit Estimation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 58(3), pages 364-372.
    8. Creel, Michael D & Loomis, John B, 1991. "Confidence Intervals for Welfare Measures with Application to a Problem of Truncated Counts," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(2), pages 370-373, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Martinez-Espineira & Joe Amoako-Tuffour, 2008. "Multi-destination and multi-purpose trip effects in the analysis of the demand for trips to a remote recreational site," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2008_19, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    2. John A. Curtis, 2002. "Estimating the Demand for Salmon Angling in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 33(3), pages 319-332.
    3. Ram Shrestha & John Loomis, 2003. "Meta-Analytic Benefit Transfer of Outdoor Recreation Economic Values: Testing Out-of-Sample Convergent Validity," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 25(1), pages 79-100, May.
    4. Nikita Lyssenko & Roberto Martínez-Espiñeira, 2012. "Respondent uncertainty in contingent valuation: the case of whale conservation in Newfoundland and Labrador," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(15), pages 1911-1930, May.
    5. Richard Melstrom, 2014. "Valuing historic battlefields: an application of the travel cost method to three American Civil War battlefields," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 38(3), pages 223-236, August.
    6. Doshi, Amar & Pascoe, Sean, 2013. "Investigating the effects of sample heterogeneity on the travel cost model for coral diving in Southeast Asia," 2013 Conference (57th), February 5-8, 2013, Sydney, Australia 152146, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    7. Chen, Min & Lupi, Frank, 2013. "Modeling Long Overnight Trips by Chaining Recreation Sites," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150489, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Ojumu, Oluwagbemiga & Hite, Diane & Fields, Deacue, 2009. "Estimating Demand For Recreational Fishing In Alabama Using Travel Cost Model," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46858, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    9. Van Sandt, Anders & Thilmany, Dawn, 2016. "Exploring the Economics of Agritourists: Customizing Travel Cost Methods to Evaluate Differences Across the Western US," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236142, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. Simões, Paula & Barata, Eduardo & Cruz, Luís, 2013. "Joint estimation using revealed and stated preference data: An application using a national forest," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 249-266.

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