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Incidental and Joint Consumption in Recreation Demand

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  • Parsons, George R.
  • Wilson, Aaron J.

Abstract

A theory for analyzing incidental consumption in a single site recreation demand model is presented. We show that incidental consumption on a recreation trip, such as a visit to see friends or a visit to a second recreation site, can be treated as a complementary good and analyzed using conventional theory. We also show that the analysis applies whether the side trips are incidental or joint. In a simple application we find that failing to account for incidental consumption appears to create little bias in valuing recreation sites.

Suggested Citation

  • Parsons, George R. & Wilson, Aaron J., 1997. "Incidental and Joint Consumption in Recreation Demand," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(1), pages 1-6, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:agrerw:v:26:y:1997:i:01:p:1-6_00
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert Mendelsohn & John Hof & George Peterson & Reed Johnson, 1992. "Measuring Recreation Values with Multiple Destination Trips," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 74(4), pages 926-933.
    2. V. Kerry Smith & Raymond J. Kopp, 1980. "The Spatial Limits of the Travel Cost Recreational Demand Model," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 56(1), pages 64-72.
    3. Englin Jeffrey & Shonkwiler J. S., 1995. "Modeling Recreation Demand in the Presence of Unobservable Travel Costs: Toward a Travel Price Model," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 368-377, November.
    4. Abraham E. Haspel & F. Reed Johnson, 1982. "Multiple Destination Trip Bias in Recreation Benefit Estimation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 58(3), pages 364-372.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kevin E. Henrickson & Erica H. Johnson, 2013. "The Demand for Spatially Complementary National Parks," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(2), pages 330-345.
    2. John Rolfe & Brenda Dyack, 2010. "Testing for convergent validity between travel cost and contingent valuation estimates of recreation values in the Coorong, Australia ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 54(4), pages 583-599, October.
    3. Bartczak, Anna & Lindhjem, Henrik & Navrud, Ståle & Zandersen, Marianne & Zylicz, Tomasz, 2008. "Valuing forest recreation on the national level in a transition economy: The case of Poland," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(7-8), pages 467-472, October.
    4. Nicolas Borzykowski & Andrea Baranzini & David Maradan, 2017. "A travel cost assessment of the demand for recreation in Swiss forests," Review of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Studies, Springer, vol. 98(3), pages 149-171, December.
    5. Smith, V. Kerry, 1997. "Time and the Valuation of Environmental Resources," Discussion Papers 10485, Resources for the Future.
    6. Chen, Min & Lupi, Frank, 2013. "Modeling Long Overnight Trips by Chaining Recreation Sites," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150489, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Kathleen P. Bell & Ivar E. Strand, 2003. "Reconciling Models of Recreational Route and Site Choices," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(3), pages 440-454.
    8. Khuda Bakhsh & Iqra Meshaal & Hudda Riaz, 2020. "Evaluating visitors’ travel demand and recreational values in Kallar Kahar Lake, Pakistan," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 22(8), pages 7951-7967, December.
    9. Roberto Martinez-Espineira & Joe Amoako-Tuffour, 2008. "Multi-destination and multi-purpose trip effects in the analysis of the demand for trips to a remote recreational site," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2008_19, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    10. Phaneuf, Daniel J. & Smith, V. Kerry, 2006. "Recreation Demand Models," Handbook of Environmental Economics, in: K. G. Mäler & J. R. Vincent (ed.), Handbook of Environmental Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 15, pages 671-761, Elsevier.
    11. Pascoe, Sean, 2019. "Recreational beach use values with multiple activities," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 137-144.
    12. Mani Nepal & Rajesh Kumar Rai & Saudamini Das & Laxmi Dutt Bhatta & Rajan Kotru & Madan Singh Khadayat & Ranbeer Singh Rawal & G. C. S. Negi, 2018. "Valuing Cultural Services of the Kailash Sacred Landscape for Sustainable Management," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(10), pages 1-19, October.
    13. Loomis, John B. & Yorizane, Shizuka & Larson, Douglas M., 2000. "Testing Significance Of Multi-Destination And Multi-Purpose Trip Effects In A Travel Cost Method Demand Model For Whale Watching Trips," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 29(2), pages 1-9, October.
    14. Van Sandt, Anders & Thilmany, Dawn, 2016. "Exploring the Economics of Agritourists: Customizing Travel Cost Methods to Evaluate Differences Across the Western US," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 236142, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    15. Richard Melstrom, 2014. "Valuing historic battlefields: an application of the travel cost method to three American Civil War battlefields," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 38(3), pages 223-236, August.
    16. Pattiz, Brian David, 2009. "Count regression models for recreation demand: an application to Clear Lake," ISU General Staff Papers 200901010800002092, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.

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