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The Effects of Civil Gang Injunctions on Reported Violent Crime: Evidence from Los Angeles County


  • Grogger, Jeffrey


Several cities have recently adopted civil injunctions as a means to reduce gang violence. To evaluate the effectiveness of such injunctions, I develop an extensive database of neighborhood-level reported crime counts from four police jurisdictions within Los Angeles County. I construct two different comparison samples of neighborhoods not covered by injunctions to control for underlying trends that could cause one to overstate the injunctions' effects. The analysis indicates that, in the first year after the injunctions are imposed, they lead the level of violent crime to decrease by 5-10 percent. Copyright 2002 by the University of Chicago.

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  • Grogger, Jeffrey, 2002. "The Effects of Civil Gang Injunctions on Reported Violent Crime: Evidence from Los Angeles County," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(1), pages 69-90, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlawec:v:45:y:2002:i:1:p:69-90

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ashenfelter, Orley C, 1978. "Estimating the Effect of Training Programs on Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(1), pages 47-57, February.
    2. Ashenfelter, Orley & Card, David, 1985. "Using the Longitudinal Structure of Earnings to Estimate the Effect of Training Programs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(4), pages 648-660, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Leah Brooks, 2006. "Volunteering To Be Taxed: Business Improvement Districts And The Extra-Governmental Provision Of Public Safety," Departmental Working Papers 2006-04, McGill University, Department of Economics.
    2. Mirko Draca & Stephen Machin & Robert Witt, 2011. "Panic on the Streets of London: Police, Crime, and the July 2005 Terror Attacks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 2157-2181, August.
    3. Seals, Richard Alan & Stern, Liliana V., 2013. "Cognitive ability and the division of labor in urban ghettos: Evidence from gang activity in U.S. data," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 140-149.
    4. Gravel, Jason & Bouchard, Martin & Descormiers, Karine & Wong, Jennifer S. & Morselli, Carlo, 2013. "Keeping promises: A systematic review and a new classification of gang control strategies," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 228-242.
    5. Anna Aizer, 2007. "Neighborhood Violence and Urban Youth," NBER Chapters,in: The Problems of Disadvantaged Youth: An Economic Perspective, pages 275-307 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Brooks, Leah, 2008. "Volunteering to be taxed: Business improvement districts and the extra-governmental provision of public safety," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1-2), pages 388-406, February.
    7. Aili Malm & George Tita, 2006. "A spatial analysis of green teams: a tactical response to marijuana production in British Columbia," Policy Sciences, Springer;Society of Policy Sciences, vol. 39(4), pages 361-377, December.

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