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Firm performance in the periphery: on the relation between firm-internal knowledge and local knowledge spillovers

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  • Markus Grillitsch
  • Magnus Nilsson

Abstract

Firm performance in the periphery: on the relation between firm-internal knowledge and local knowledge spillovers. Regional Studies. One of the most established arguments in regional studies is that knowledge dynamics shape the geography of economic activities and, more specifically, that knowledge-intensive activities benefit from collocation due to knowledge spillovers, local buzz and access to labour. There are, however, competing arguments that knowledge-intensive firms also suffer from negative spillovers and are less dependent on local knowledge sources than often presumed. Using Swedish micro-data from 2005–11, this paper shows that firms with weak internal knowledge grow faster in knowledge-intensive regions. However, the growth difference disappears or is even reversed for knowledge-intensive firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Markus Grillitsch & Magnus Nilsson, 2017. "Firm performance in the periphery: on the relation between firm-internal knowledge and local knowledge spillovers," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(8), pages 1219-1231, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:51:y:2017:i:8:p:1219-1231
    DOI: 10.1080/00343404.2016.1175554
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    Cited by:

    1. Grillitsch, Markus & Trippl, Michaela, 2016. "Innovation Policies and New Regional Growth Paths: A place-based system failure framework," Papers in Innovation Studies 2016/26, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    2. repec:pal:jintbs:v:50:y:2019:i:2:d:10.1057_s41267-018-0164-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:taf:regstd:v:51:y:2017:i:8:p:1133-1137 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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