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The complementary effects of proximity dimensions on knowledge spillovers

  • R. Paci


  • E. Marrocu


  • S. Usai


The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of various proximity dimensions on the innovative capacity of 276 regions in Europe within a knowledge production function model, where R&D and human capital are included as the main internal inputs. We combine the standard geographical proximity with the technological, social and organizational ones to assess whether they are substitutes or complements in channelling knowledge spillovers. Results show that all proximities have a significant complementary role in generating an important flow of knowledge across regions, with technological closeness showing the most important effect.

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Paper provided by Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia in its series Working Paper CRENoS with number 201121.

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Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cns:cnscwp:201121
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  1. J. Elhorst, 2010. "Applied Spatial Econometrics: Raising the Bar," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 9-28.
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  4. Luisa Corrado & Bernard Fingleton, 2011. "Where is the Economics in Spatial Econometrics?," SERC Discussion Papers 0071, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
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  6. Rosina Moreno & Raffaele Paci & Stefano Usai, 2005. "Spatial spillovers and innovation activity in European regions," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 37(10), pages 1793-1812, October.
  7. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters, in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar.
  8. James P. LeSage & Manfred M. Fischer & Thomas Scherngell, 2007. "Knowledge spillovers across Europe: Evidence from a Poisson spatial interaction model with spatial effects," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 86(3), pages 393-421, 08.
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  10. Ron Boschma, 2005. "Proximity and Innovation: A Critical Assessment," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 61-74.
  11. Olivier Parent & James P. Lesage, 2007. "Using the Variance Structure of the Conditional Autoregressive Spatial Specification to Model Knowledge Spillovers," University of Cincinnati, Economics Working Papers Series 2007-03, University of Cincinnati, Department of Economics.
  12. Kelejian, Harry H. & Prucha, Ingmar R., 2010. "Specification and estimation of spatial autoregressive models with autoregressive and heteroskedastic disturbances," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 157(1), pages 53-67, July.
  13. Jarno Hoekman & Koen Frenken & Frank van Oort, 2008. "The geography of collaborative knowledge production in Europe," KITeS Working Papers 214, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Feb 2008.
  14. Christophe Carrincazeaux & Marie Coris, 2011. "Proximity and Innovation," Chapters, in: Handbook of Regional Innovation and Growth, chapter 20 Edward Elgar.
  15. Mario Maggioni & Teodora Erika Uberti & Stefano Usai, 2011. "Treating Patents as Relational Data: Knowledge Transfers and Spillovers across Italian Provinces," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 39-67.
  16. Meric S. Gertler, 2003. "Tacit knowledge and the economic geography of context, or The undefinable tacitness of being (there)," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(1), pages 75-99, January.
  17. Mario A. Maggioni & Mario Nosvelli & Teodora Erika Uberti, 2007. "Space versus networks in the geography of innovation: A European analysis," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 86(3), pages 471-493, 08.
  18. Raffaele Paci & Stefano Usai, 2009. "Knowledge flows across European regions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 669-690, September.
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