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Quality of Human and Physical Capital and Technological Gaps across Italian Regions

  • Vincenzo Scoppa

Scoppa V. (2007) Quality of human and physical capital and technological gaps across Italian regions, Regional Studies 41, 585-599. This paper evaluates the relative contribution of factor accumulation and technology in explaining output per worker differences across Italian regions. The contributions of physical and human capital are separately estimated through the variance decomposition of output per worker. Whereas from a basic analysis of development accounting with crude data total factor productivity (TFP) emerges as a fundamental determinant, when more accurate data are used in the estimations of human and physical capital to take into account their quality, results change radically, showing a higher importance of factor accumulation with respect to previous standard estimations. Scoppa V. (2007) La qualite des capitaux humain et physique et les ecarts technologiques a travers les regions d'Italie, Regional Studies 41, 585-599. Cet article cherche a evaluer la contribution relative de l'accumulation de facteurs et de la technologie afin d'expliquer les ecarts de rendement par travailleur a travers les regions d'Italie. On estime separement la contribution des capitaux physique et humain par moyen de la variance decomposee du rendement par travailleur. Alors qu'a partir d'une analyse de base de la comptabilite de developpement, la TFP (productivite globale des facteurs) s'avere un determinant essentiel, quand on emploie des donnees plus justes pour estimer les capitaux humain et physique pour tenir compte de leur qualite, les resultats sont radicalement transformes, accordant une plus grande importance a l'accumulation de facteurs par rapport aux estimations standard anterieures. Qualite du capital humain Amenagement du territoire Productivite globale des facteurs Scoppa V. (2007) Qualitat des humanen und physischen Kapitals und technologische Lucken in verschiedenen italienischen Regionen, Regional Studies 41, 585-599. In diesem Aufsatz wird der relative Beitrag der Faktorenakkumulation und Technologie zur Erklarung der Unterschiede zwischen verschiedenen italienischen Regionen hinsichtlich der Leistung pro Arbeitnehmer untersucht. Die Beitrage des physischen und humanen Kapitals werden mit Hilfe einer Varianzdekomposition der Leistung pro Arbeitnehmer gesondert geschatzt. Bei einer Grundanalyse der Entwicklung mit Hilfe roher Daten erweist sich die Gesamtfaktorproduktivitat als fundamentaler Determinant. Werden jedoch genauere Daten zur Schatzung des humanen und physischen Kapitals herangezogen, um deren Qualitat zu berucksichtigen, andern sich die Ergebnisse radikal und weisen auf eine hohere Bedeutung der Faktorenakkumulation fur die fruheren Standardschatzungen hin. Qualitat des Humankapitals Regionalentwicklung; Gesamtfaktorproduktivitat Scoppa V. (2007) Calidad del capital humano y fisico y vacios tecnologicos en las regiones italianas, Regional Studies 41, 585-599. En este documento se evalua la contribucion relativa de la acumulacion de factores y la tecnologia para explicar las diferencias de rendimiento por trabajador entre las regiones de Italia. Se calculan por separado las contribuciones del capital humano y fisico a traves de la descomposicion de varianza del rendimiento por trabajador. Mientras que, a partir de un analisis basico de desarrollo mediante datos brutos, la productividad total de los factores surge como un determinante fundamental, cuando se utilizan datos mas exactos en las estimaciones de capital humano y fisico para tener en cuenta su calidad, los resultados cambian radicalmente y muestran una mayor importancia de la acumulacion de factores con respecto a las estimaciones estandares anteriores. Calidad del capital humano; Desarrollo regional; Productividad total de los factores

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 41 (2007)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 585-599

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Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:41:y:2007:i:5:p:585-599
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