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Industrialization, urbanization and land use in China

Author

Listed:
  • Xiaobo Zhang
  • Timothy Mount
  • Richard Boisvert

Abstract

Rapid industrial development and urbanization transfer more and more land away from agricultural production and affect the patterns of land use intensity. This paper analyzes the determinants of land use by modeling arable land and sown area separately. An inverse U-shaped relationship between land use intensity and industrialization is explored both theoretically and empirically. The findings highlight the conflict between the two policy goals of industrialization and grain self-sufficiency in the end. Several policy recommendations are offered to reconcile the conflict.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaobo Zhang & Timothy Mount & Richard Boisvert, 2004. "Industrialization, urbanization and land use in China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(3), pages 207-224.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:2:y:2004:i:3:p:207-224
    DOI: 10.1080/1476528042000276132
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Qian, Yingyi & Roland, Gerard, 1998. "Federalism and the Soft Budget Constraint," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1143-1162, December.
    2. Fan, Shenggen & Agcaoili-Sombilla, Mercedita C., 1997. "Why projections on China's future food supply and demand differ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 41(2), June.
    3. Chambers,Robert G., 1988. "Applied Production Analysis," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521314275.
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    5. Rozelle, Scott & Boisvert, Richard N., 1995. "Control in a dynamic village economy: The reforms and unbalanced development in China's rural economy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 233-252, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anping Chen & Marlon Boarnet & Mark Partridge & Yongzheng Liu & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2014. "Interjurisdictional Tax Competition In China," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 606-628, September.
    2. Zhang, Xiaobo, 2006. "Asymmetric property rights in China's economic growth:," DSGD discussion papers 28, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Renkow, Mitch, 2010. "Impacts of IFPRI's "priorities for pro-poor public investment" global research program:," Impact assessments 31, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Ziang, Xiaobo, 2005. "Fiscal decentralization and political centralization in China," DSGD discussion papers 21, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Wei Tian & Liugang Sheng & Hongyan Zhao, 2016. "Special Section: China's Growing Trade and its Role to the World Economy," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 84-101, February.
    6. Fan, Shenggen & Li, Lixing & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2012. "Challenges of creating cities in China: Lessons from a short-lived county-to-city upgrading policy," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 476-491.
    7. Nancy H. Chau & Weiwen Zhang, 2011. "Harnessing the Forces of Urban Expansion: The Public Economics of Farmland Development Allowances," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(3), pages 488-507.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrialization; urbanization; land use and China; JEL classifications: O13; Q15; R14;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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