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China’s Economic Development

Author

Listed:
  • Lu Ming
  • Zhao Chen
  • Yongqin Wang
  • Yan Zhang
  • Yuan Zhang
  • Changyuan Luo

Abstract

The authors identify three major factors in the growth of the Chinese economy: economic decentralization and political centralization; the urban–rural divide; and relational society. These are explored in depth via analyses of factors including urban and rural economic development and their political and social foundations, industrial agglomeration, transitions of public services and governmental responsibilities towards them and developmental imbalances and mechanisms. It is illustrated that whilst contemporary China has obviously made great economic strides, a wide variety of problems are accumulating over time. The book concludes that following three decades of high economic growth, China now faces great challenges for sustainable growth, and the institutions of China’s economy have reached a critical point. Strategies for dealing with these challenges and requirements for the successful future development of China are thus prescribed.

Suggested Citation

  • Lu Ming & Zhao Chen & Yongqin Wang & Yan Zhang & Yuan Zhang & Changyuan Luo, 2013. "China’s Economic Development," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14502.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:14502
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    Cited by:

    1. Gindling,T. H. & Mossaad,Nadwa & Newhouse,David Locke, 2016. "Earnings premiums and penalties for self-employment and informal employees around the world," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7530, The World Bank.

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    Book Chapters

    The following chapters of this book are listed in IDEAS

    Keywords

    Asian Studies; Development Studies; Economics and Finance;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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