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Why is China different from Eastern Europe? Perspectives from organization theory


  • Qian, Yingyi
  • Roland, Gerard
  • Xu, Chenggang


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  • Qian, Yingyi & Roland, Gerard & Xu, Chenggang, 1999. "Why is China different from Eastern Europe? Perspectives from organization theory," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 1085-1094, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:43:y:1999:i:4-6:p:1085-1094

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. McMillan, John & Naughton, Barry, 1992. "How to Reform a Planned Economy: Lessons from China," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(1), pages 130-143, Spring.
    2. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Wing Thye Woo, 2000. "Understanding china's economic performance," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 1-50.
    3. Dewatripont, Mathias & Roland, Gerard, 1995. "The Design of Reform Packages under Uncertainty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1207-1223, December.
    4. Qian, Yingyi & Xu, Cheng-Gang, 1993. "Why China's economic reforms differ: the m-form hierarchy and entry/expansion of the non-state sector," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 3755, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    2. Sweder J. G. van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2016. "Learning Dynamics and Support for Economic Reforms: Why Good News Can Be Bad," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(1), pages 1-23.
    3. Bhaumik, Sumon Kumar & Estrin, Saul, 2007. "How transition paths differ: Enterprise performance in Russia and China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 374-392, March.
    4. Wang Ning, 2015. "The Chinese Economic System Under Mao," Man and the Economy, De Gruyter, vol. 2(2), pages 153-193, December.
    5. Nauro F. Campos & Abrizio Coricelli, 2002. "Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don't, and What We Should," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 793-836, September.
    6. Sumon Bhaumik & Saul Estrin, 2003. "Why Transition Paths Differ: Russian and Chinese Enterprise Performance Compared," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 525, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    7. Westerlund, Joakim & Edgerton, David L. & Opper, Sonja, 2010. "Why is Chinese provincial output diverging?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 333-344, August.
    8. ROZELLE, Scott & SWINNEN, Johan F.M., 2009. "Why did the communist party reform in China, but not in the Soviet Union? The political economy of agricultural transition," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 275-287, June.
    9. Lu Ming & Zhao Chen & Yongqin Wang & Yan Zhang & Yuan Zhang & Changyuan Luo, 2013. "China’s Economic Development," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14502.
    10. Singh, Nirvikar, 2007. "The Dynamics of Reform of India’s Federal System," MPRA Paper 2282, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Zou, Hong & Adams, Mike B., 2006. "The corporate purchase of property insurance: Chinese evidence," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 165-196, April.
    12. Nirvikar Singh, 2007. "The dynamics of reform of India’s federal system," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 8(1), pages 22-31, April.
    13. Brezis, Elise S. & Verdier, Thierry, 2003. "Political institutions and economic reforms in Central and Eastern Europe: a snowball effect," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 289-311, September.
    14. repec:eee:jcecon:v:45:y:2017:i:4:p:685-711 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Chang Liu & Guangrong Ma, 2016. "Taxation without representation: local fiscal response to intergovernmental transfers in China," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(5), pages 854-874, October.
    16. Sweder van Wijnbergen & Tim Willems, 2012. "Learning Dynamics and the Support for Economic Reforms: Why Good News can be Bad," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-043/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    17. Johan F.M. Swinnen & Anneleen Vandeplas & Miet Maertens, 2009. "Liberalization with Endogenous Institutions: A Comparative Analysis of Agricultural Reform in Africa, Asia, and Europe," LICOS Discussion Papers 23309, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    18. Fonseka, M.M. & Colombage, Sisira R.N. & Tian, Gao-Liang, 2014. "Effects of regulator's announcements, information asymmetry and ownership changes on private equity placements: Evidence from China," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 126-149.

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