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On consumers' willingness to purchase nutritionally enhanced genetically modified food

Author

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  • Maurizio Canavari
  • Rodolfo Nayga

Abstract

This study assesses consumers' willingness to purchase genetically modified (GM) food products with two different types of benefits: an input (i.e., reduced pesticides) and an output trait benefit (i.e., nutritionally enhanced). Data were collected using a telephone survey of an Italian households sample. Discrete choice approach is used to elicit the purchase intentions of the respondents. Four separate probit models are estimated to examine the effect of various factors on choices. Results suggest that majority of Italians are not willing to buy GM food products even if they are nutritionally enhanced. However, more consumers are willing to buy a nutritionally enhanced plant based GM product than a traditional plant based GM (with input trait benefit). Willingness to buy for a nutritionally enhanced animal based GM product and for a traditional animal based GM product with input trait benefit are similar. Consumers unwilling to buy GM food would not buy it even if it is nutritionally enhanced and has lower price. However, there is a niche of consumers who are willing to buy nutritionally enhanced GM food products even at a premium. Knowledge of science and trust in scientists consistently affect Italian consumers' willingness to buy the GM products.

Suggested Citation

  • Maurizio Canavari & Rodolfo Nayga, 2009. "On consumers' willingness to purchase nutritionally enhanced genetically modified food," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(1), pages 125-137.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:1:p:125-137
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840701367564
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Grunert, Klaus G. & Lähteenmäki, Liisa & Nielsen, Niels A. & Poulsen, Jacob B. & Ueland, Oydis & Åström, Annika, 2000. "Consumer perception of food products involving genetic modification: Results from a qualitative study in four Nordic countries," MAPP Working Papers 72, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, The MAPP Centre.
    2. Rousu, Matthew & Huffman, Wallace & Shogren, Jason F. & Tegene, Abebayehu, 2002. "The Value of Verifiable Information in a Controversial Market: Evidence from Lab Auctions of Genetically Modified Food," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10009, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Soregaroli, Claudio & Boccaletti, Stefano & Moro, Daniele, 2003. "Consumer's Attitude Towards Labeled and Unlabeled GM Food Products in Italy," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 6(02).
    4. Hallman, William K. & Adelaja, Adesoji O. & Schilling, Brian J. & Lang, John T., 2002. "Public Perceptions Of Genetically Modified Foods: Americans Know Not What They Eat," Working Papers 18176, Rutgers University, Food Policy Institute.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rodríguez-Entrena, Macario & Salazar-Ordóñez, Melania & Sayadi, Samir, 2013. "Applying partial least squares to model genetically modified food purchase intentions in southern Spain consumers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 44-53.
    2. Damien Rousselière & Samira Rousselière, 2010. "On the impact of trust on consumer willingness to purchase GM food:Evidence from a European survey," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 91(1), pages 5-26.
    3. repec:ura:ecregj:v:1:y:2018:i:1:p:216-226 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Canavari, Maurizio & Tisselli, Farid & Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr. & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2009. "Italian Consumer Acceptance of Nutritionally Enhanced GM Food," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51651, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. repec:ide:wpaper:27994 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Manuel Thiel & Rainer Marggraf, 2009. "Gentechnik oder nicht Gentechnik - Bestimmungsgründe der Wahl von (nicht) gentechnisch veränderten Produkten," Journal of Socio-Economics in Agriculture (Until 2015: Yearbook of Socioeconomics in Agriculture), Swiss Society for Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, vol. 2(1), pages 35-58.

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