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Exploring the root causes of terrorism in South Asia: everybody should be concerned

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Listed:
  • Ghulam Akhmat

    ()

  • Khalid Zaman

    ()

  • Tan Shukui

    ()

  • Faiza Sajjad

    ()

Abstract

The limited research undertaken thus far to discover the root causes of terrorism in South Asia. This study takes an initiative to explore root causes of terrorism in South Asia by using panel technique during the period of 1980–2011. The results show that GDP per capita decreases terrorism incidence, however, remaining other economic factors i.e., population, unemployment, inflation, poverty, inequality and political instability exhibits the positive association with the terrorism incidence in South Asia. Some exploratory economic factors are more elastic in nature, as income inequality exhibits the largest share i.e., 1.242 %, followed by population growth rate (i.e., 1.125 %) and political instability (i.e., 1.102 %) respectively. Unemployment rate are around one-to-one relationship with the terrorism incidence in this region. In addition, there is a significant relationship between poverty and terrorism incidence, as if there is 1 % increase in poverty rate, incidence of terrorism increases by 0.758 % in FMOLS and 0.654 % in case of DOLS estimators. This result confirm the conventional view i.e., poverty cause terrorism in South Asia. One of the major economic problems arises when price level associates with the terrorism incidence in this region, which further leads to peoples inside the poverty trap. Finally, trade openness does not act in accordance with significant contributor for terrorism incidence in South Asia, however, the importance of trade liberalization polices may not be neglected in relation with terrorism incidence in this region. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Ghulam Akhmat & Khalid Zaman & Tan Shukui & Faiza Sajjad, 2014. "Exploring the root causes of terrorism in South Asia: everybody should be concerned," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(6), pages 3065-3079, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:qualqt:v:48:y:2014:i:6:p:3065-3079
    DOI: 10.1007/s11135-013-9941-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eco:journ1:2017-05-28 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Syed Ali Raza & Muhammad Shahbaz & Sudharshan Reddy Paramati, 2017. "Dynamics of Military Expenditure and Income Inequality in Pakistan," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 1035-1055, April.
    3. repec:ags:afjecr:264468 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Raza, Syed Ali & Shah, Nida & Khan, Waqas Ahmed, 2017. "Do Workers’ Remittances Increase Terrorism? Evidence from South Asian Countries," MPRA Paper 86745, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2017.

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