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Ranking high schools using university student performance in Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Carmen Aina

    (Università del Piemonte Orientale
    GLO)

  • Massimiliano Bratti

    (GLO
    Università degli Studi di Milano
    IZA
    Centro Studi Luca d’Agliano)

  • Enrico Lippo

    (Università del Piemonte Orientale)

Abstract

The Eduscopio project is the first attempt to build school performance indicators based on the university performance of high school leavers in Italy. It provides stakeholders (students and their families) with publicly available school performance indicators, and school rankings. A potential weakness of Eduscopio is that it relies on first-year student performance only. In this study, we extend its methodology to include longer-term academic outcomes, such as cumulative third-year performance and the probability of on-time graduation. Our results demonstrate that differences in university students’ performance across high schools are not temporary and limited to the first-year, but persist in the following academic years, and that the ranking of high schools based on longer-term indicators remains rather stable. Moreover, our analysis highlights non-negligible differences of between-school track dispersion in the Eduscopio index across cities, which hints on geographical differences in student selection mechanisms into school tracks or in the level of dispersion of school value added within tracks.

Suggested Citation

  • Carmen Aina & Massimiliano Bratti & Enrico Lippo, 2021. "Ranking high schools using university student performance in Italy," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 38(1), pages 293-321, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:epolit:v:38:y:2021:i:1:d:10.1007_s40888-020-00208-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s40888-020-00208-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Eduscopio; High school; University performance; School ranking; Italy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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