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Fertility Responses of High-Skilled Native Women to Immigrant Inflows

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  • Delia Furtado

    () (University of Connecticut)

Abstract

Abstract Despite debate regarding the magnitude of the impact, immigrant inflows are generally understood to depress wages and increase employment in immigrant-intensive sectors. In light of the overrepresentation of the foreign-born in the childcare industry, this article examines whether college-educated native women respond to immigrant-induced lower cost and potentially more convenient childcare options with increased fertility. An analysis of U.S. Census data between 1980 and 2000 suggests that immigrant inflows are indeed associated with native women’s increased likelihoods of having a baby, and responses are strongest among women who are most likely to consider childcare costs when making fertility decisions—namely, married women and women with a graduate degree. Given that native women also respond to immigrant inflows by working long hours, this article concludes with an analysis of the types of women who have stronger fertility responses versus labor supply responses to immigration.

Suggested Citation

  • Delia Furtado, 2016. "Fertility Responses of High-Skilled Native Women to Immigrant Inflows," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(1), pages 27-53, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:53:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s13524-015-0444-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-015-0444-8
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    Cited by:

    1. Delia Furtado, 2015. "Can immigrants help women “have it all”? Immigrant labor and women’s joint fertility and labor supply decisions," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, December.
    2. repec:eee:regeco:v:67:y:2017:i:c:p:119-134 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Edwards, Ryan & Ortega, Francesc, 2017. "The economic contribution of unauthorized workers: An industry analysis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 119-134.
    4. Romiti, Agnese, 2016. "The effects of immigration on household services, labour supply and fertility," IAB Discussion Paper 201640, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Delia Furtado, 2015. "Immigrant labor and work-family decisions of native-born women," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 139-139, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Childcare; Immigration; Labor supply;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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