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Can immigrants help women “have it all”? Immigrant labor and women’s joint fertility and labor supply decisions

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  • Delia Furtado

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Abstract

This paper explores how inflows of low-skilled immigrants impact the tradeoffs women face when making joint fertility and labor supply decisions. I find increases in fertility and decreases in labor force participation rates among high-skilled US-born women in cities that have experienced larger immigrant inflows. Most interestingly, these changes have been accompanied by decreases in the strength of the negative correlation between childbearing and labor force participation, an often-used measure of the difficulty with which women combine motherhood and labor market work. Using a structured statistical model, I show that the immigrant-induced attenuation of this negative correlation can explain about 24% of the immigrant-induced increases in the joint likelihood of childbearing and labor force participation in the US between the years 1980 and 2000. JEL codes D10, F22, J13, J22, R23 Copyright Furtado. 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Delia Furtado, 2015. "Can immigrants help women “have it all”? Immigrant labor and women’s joint fertility and labor supply decisions," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izamig:v:4:y:2015:i:1:p:1-19:10.1186/s40176-015-0043-x
    DOI: 10.1186/s40176-015-0043-x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Delia Furtado, 2016. "Fertility Responses of High-Skilled Native Women to Immigrant Inflows," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(1), pages 27-53, February.
    2. Isabel Ruiz & Carlos Vargas-Silva, 2017. "The impact of hosting refugees on the intra-household allocation of tasks: A gender perspective," WIDER Working Paper Series 066, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Delia Furtado, 2015. "Immigrant labor and work-family decisions of native-born women," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 139-139, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child care; Fertility; Labor force participation; Immigration; Tetrachoric correlation;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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