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Comparing Agricultural Total Factor Productivity between Australia, Canada, and the United States, 1961-2006

Author

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  • Yu Sheng

    ()

  • Eldon Ball

    ()

  • Katerina Nossal

    ()

Abstract

This article provides a comparison of levels and growth of agricultural total factor productivity between Australia, Canada, and the United States for the 1961–2006 period. A production account for agriculture that is consistent across the three countries is constructed to estimate output, input and total factor productivity, and a dynamic panel regression is used to link the productivity estimates to potential determinants. We show that investment in public research and development and infrastructure plays an important role in explaining differences in productivity levels between countries. The findings provide useful insights into how public policy could be used to sustain agricultural productivity growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Yu Sheng & Eldon Ball & Katerina Nossal, 2015. "Comparing Agricultural Total Factor Productivity between Australia, Canada, and the United States, 1961-2006," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 29, pages 38-59, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:29:y:2015:3
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    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/ipm/29/shengballandnossal.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Angela Lusigi & Colin Thirtle, 1997. "Total Factor Productivity And The Effects Of R&D In African Agriculture," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 529-538.
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    3. László Drechsler, 1973. "Weighting Of Index Numbers In Multilateral International Comparisons," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 19(1), pages 17-34, March.
    4. Robert F. J. Romain & John B. Penson jr. & Rémy E. Lambert, 1987. "Capacity Depreciation, Implicit Rental Price, and Investment Demand for Farm Tractors in Canada," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 35(2), pages 373-385, July.
    5. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, January.
    6. Diewert, W Erwin, 1978. "Superlative Index Numbers and Consistency in Aggregation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(4), pages 883-900, July.
    7. Yu Sheng & Shiji Zhao & Katarina Nossal & Dandan Zhang, 2015. "Productivity and farm size in Australian agriculture: reinvestigating the returns to scale," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 59(1), pages 16-38, January.
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    11. V. Eldon Ball & Jean‐Pierre Butault & Carlos San Juan & Ricardo Mora, 2010. "Productivity and international competitiveness of agriculture in the European Union and the United States," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(6), pages 611-627, November.
    12. Beddow, Jason M. & Pardey, Philip G. & Alston, Julian M., 2009. "The Shifting Global Patterns of Agricultural Productivity," Choices: The Magazine of Food, Farm, and Resource Issues, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 24(4), pages 1-10.
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    14. V.E. Ball & A. Barkaoui & J.C. Bureau & J.P. Butault, 1997. "Aggregation methods for intercountry comparisons of prices and real values in agriculture : a review and synthesis," Post-Print hal-01072590, HAL.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wenbiao Cai, 2017. "We See Thee Rise: Quantifying Farm Size Expansion in Canada," Departmental Working Papers 2017-01, The University of Winnipeg, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agriculture; Canada; Australia; United States; Total Factor Productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • N52 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-
    • N57 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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