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International Agricultural Productivity Patterns

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  • Craig, Barbara J.
  • Pardey, Philip G.
  • Roseboom, Johannes

Abstract

In this paper we present measures of land and labor productivity for a group of 98 developed and developing countries using an entirely new data set with annual observations spanning the past three decades. The substantial cross-country and intertemporal variation in productivity in our sample is linked to both natural and economic factors. We extend previous work by dealing with multiple sources of measurement error in conventional agricultural inputs when accounting for observed differences in productivity. In addition to the mix of conventional inputs in agriculture, we find that indicators of quality change in these inputs and the amount of publicly provided infrastructure are significant in explaining cross-sectional differences in productivity patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Craig, Barbara J. & Pardey, Philip G. & Roseboom, Johannes, 1994. "International Agricultural Productivity Patterns," Working Papers 14470, University of Minnesota, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:umciwp:14470
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/14470
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Antle, John M, 1983. "Infrastructure and Aggregate Agricultural Productivity: International Evidence," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(3), pages 609-619, April.
    2. Binswanger, Hans & Yang, Maw-Cheng & Bowers, Alan & Mundlak, Yair, 1987. "On the determinants of cross-country aggregate agricultural supply," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1-2), pages 111-131.
    3. Robert Summers & Alan Heston, 1991. "The Penn World Table (Mark 5): An Expanded Set of International Comparisons, 1950–1988," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 327-368.
    4. Pardey, Philip G & Roseboom, Johannes & Craig, Barbara J, 1992. "A Yardstick for International Comparisons: An Application to National Agricultural Research Expenditures," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40(2), pages 333-349, January.
    5. Peterson, Willis L., 1988. "International Supply Response," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(4), December.
    6. Lau, Lawrence J. & Yotopoulos, Pan A., 1989. "The meta-production function approach to technological change in world agriculture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 241-269, October.
    7. Alston, Julian M. & Pardey, Philip G. & Taylor, Michael J., 2001. "Agricultural science policy," Food policy statements 32, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Peterson, Willis, 1988. "International supply response," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 2(4), pages 365-374, December.
    9. Kawagoe, Toshihiko & Hayami, Yujiro & Ruttan, Vernon W., 1985. "The intercountry agricultural production function and productivity differences among countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 113-132.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Moyo, Dumisani Zondiwe, 2012. "Agricultural Resilience According To Indigenous Knowledge-Based Case Studies And Economic Quantitative International Production Studies: Divergent Realities Or Divergent Representation?," Research Theses 157594, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    2. Wood, Stanley & Pardey, Philip G., 1997. "Agroecological aspects of evaluating agricultural research and development:," EPTD discussion papers 23, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Wood, Stanley & Pardey, Philip G., 1998. "Agroecological aspects of evaluating agricultural R&D," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 13-41, May.
    4. Yu Sheng & Eldon Ball & Katerina Nossal, 2015. "Comparing Agricultural Total Factor Productivity between Australia, Canada, and the United States, 1961-2006," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 29, pages 38-59, Fall.
    5. Trueblood, Michael A., 1994. "An Annotated Bibliography Of Selected Productivity Literature," Staff Papers 13580, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.

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    Keywords

    Productivity Analysis;

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