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The Interplay between Regulations and Financial Stability

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  • Franklin Allen

    () (Imperial College London)

  • Xian Gu

    () (Central University of Finance and Economics)

Abstract

The crisis demonstrated that microprudential regulation focusing on the risks taken by individual banks is not sufficient to prevent crises. This is because it ignores systemic risk. Six types of systemic risk are identified, namely: (i) panics – banking crises due to multiple equilibria; (ii) banking crises due to asset price falls; (iii) contagion; (iv) financial architecture; (v) foreign exchange mismatches in the banking system; (vi) behavioral effects from Knightian uncertainty. We focus on the first three as they are arguably the main causes of the 2007–9 crisis and consider regulatory and other policies to counteract them.

Suggested Citation

  • Franklin Allen & Xian Gu, 2018. "The Interplay between Regulations and Financial Stability," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 53(2), pages 233-248, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfsres:v:53:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10693-018-0296-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s10693-018-0296-7
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    Cited by:

    1. Franklin Allen & Itay Goldstein & Julapa Jagtiani, 2018. "The Interplay among Financial Regulations, Resilience, and Growth," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 53(2), pages 141-162, June.
    2. Joe Peek, 2018. "Comments on “The Interplay between Regulations and Financial Stability”," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 53(2), pages 249-254, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial crises; Asset price bubbles; Contagion; Macroprudential;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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