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Gender differences in the dictator experiment: evidence from the matrilineal Mosuo and the patriarchal Yi

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  • Binglin Gong
  • Huibin Yan
  • Chun-Lei Yang

Abstract

In this study, we report experimental results on the dictator decision collected in two neighboring ethnic minority groups, the matrilineal Mosuo and the patriarchal Yi, in southwestern China. We follow the double-blind protocol as in Eckel and Grossman (in Handbook of experimental economics results, 1998 ), who find that women in the U.S. donate more than men. We find this pattern reversed in the Mosuo society and find no gender difference in the Yi society. This is highly suggestive that societal factors play an important role in shaping the gender differences in pro-social behavior such as dictator giving. Copyright Economic Science Association 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Binglin Gong & Huibin Yan & Chun-Lei Yang, 2015. "Gender differences in the dictator experiment: evidence from the matrilineal Mosuo and the patriarchal Yi," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 18(2), pages 302-313, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:expeco:v:18:y:2015:i:2:p:302-313
    DOI: 10.1007/s10683-014-9403-2
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    Cited by:

    1. Smriti Sharma, 2015. "Gender and Distributional Preferences: Experimental Evidence from India," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2015-062, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Alberto J. C. Micheletti & Graeme D. Ruxton & Andy Gardner, 2020. "The demography of human warfare can drive sex differences in altruism," Post-Print hal-02493903, HAL.
    3. van Hoorn, André, 2018. "The use of identity primes to explain behavioral differences between groups: A methodological note," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 146-150.
    4. Shahriar, Abu Zafar M., 2018. "Gender differences in entrepreneurial propensity: Evidence from matrilineal and patriarchal societies," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 762-779.
    5. Giuliano, Paola, 2017. "Gender: An Historical Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 10931, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Hiller, Victor & Baudin, Thomas, 2016. "Cultural transmission and the evolution of gender roles," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 8-23.
    7. Giuliano, Paola, 2020. "Gender and Culture," CEPR Discussion Papers 15185, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Schwieren, Christiane & Klonner, Stefan & Pal, Sumantra, 2020. "Equality of the Sexes and Gender Differences in Competition: Evidence from Three Traditional Societies," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224523, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    9. Lata Gangadharan & Tarun Jain & Pushkar Maitra & Joe Vecci, 2021. "Lab-in-the-Field Experiments: Perspectives from Research on Gender," Monash Economics Working Papers 2021-03, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    10. Steffen Andersen & Seda Ertac & Uri Gneezy & John A. List & Sandra Maximiano, 2018. "On the cultural basis of gender differences in negotiation," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(4), pages 757-778, December.
    11. Ece Yagman & Malcolm Keswell, 2015. "Accents, Race and Discrimination: Evidence from a Trust Game," SALDRU Working Papers 158, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender difference; Ethnic difference; Dictator game; Matrilineal society; Field experiment; C93; D03; Z1; J15; J16;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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