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Accounting for Preference and Scale Heterogeneity in Establishing Whether it Matters Who is Interviewed to Reveal Household Automobile Purchase Preferences

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  • David Hensher

    ()

  • Matthew Beck

    ()

  • John Rose

    ()

Abstract

The choice of automobile purchases in households often involves participation of more than one household member, each of which exerts some degree of influence on the final choice outcome. The influence of more than one agent has been recognised for many years, and yet the majority of automobile choice studies develop choice models as if a single agent is involved in the preference revelation process. What is not clear is whether it makes any substantive difference in preference revelation according to who is interviewed in a household. Using a generalised mixed logit framework that accounts for preference and scale heterogeneity, we estimate a series of models to investigate whether there are significant differences between the preferences of each individual in a household when assessed in isolation from other household members, as well as their joint preferences when expressing their preferences through a group choice task. The context is choosing amongst petrol, diesel and hybrid fuelled vehicles (associated with specific levels of fuel efficiency and engine capacity) when faced with a mix of vehicle prices, fuel prices, fixed annual registration fees, annual emission surcharges and vehicle kilometre emission surcharges. Using a stated choice experiment, we find that sampling a single individual as a representative of the household’s preferences is less appropriate than utilising preference information from the relevant group of decision makers in the household. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Suggested Citation

  • David Hensher & Matthew Beck & John Rose, 2011. "Accounting for Preference and Scale Heterogeneity in Establishing Whether it Matters Who is Interviewed to Reveal Household Automobile Purchase Preferences," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 49(1), pages 1-22, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:49:y:2011:i:1:p:1-22
    DOI: 10.1007/s10640-010-9420-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Donna Dosman & Wiktor Adamowicz, 2006. "Combining Stated and Revealed Preference Data to Construct an Empirical Examination of Intrahousehold Bargaining," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 15-34, March.
    2. Menasco, Michael B & Curry, David J, 1989. " Utility and Choice: An Empirical Study of Wife/Husband Decision Makin g," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 87-97, June.
    3. Ann Brewer & David Hensher, 2000. "Distributed work and travel behaviour: The dynamics of interactive agency choices between employers and employees," Transportation, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 117-148, February.
    4. Train,Kenneth E., 2009. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521747387, October.
    5. Ian Bateman & Alistair Munro, 2005. "An Experiment on Risky Choice Amongst Households," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(502), pages 176-189, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kragt, Marit Ellen, 2013. "Comparing models of unobserved heterogeneity in environmental choice experiments," Working Papers 144447, University of Western Australia, School of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    2. Sánchez Navarro, Dennis, 2013. "Análisis de elasticidades en el mercado automotor colombiano (2009 - 2011) mediante un modelo logit anidado
      [Analysis Of Elasticity In Colombian Automotive Market (2009 - 2011) Through A Nested Log
      ," MPRA Paper 46043, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Rose, John M. & Beck, Matthew J. & Hensher, David A., 2015. "The joint estimation of respondent-reported certainty and acceptability with choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 141-152.
    4. Shr, Yau-Huo & Ready, Richard C. & Orland, Brian & Echols, Stuart, 2017. "Do Visual Representations Influence Survey Responses? Evidence from a Choice Experiment on Landscape Attributes of Green Infrastructure," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258397, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Ricardo A. Daziano & Martin Achtnicht, 2014. "Forecasting Adoption of Ultra-Low-Emission Vehicles Using Bayes Estimates of a Multinomial Probit Model and the GHK Simulator," Transportation Science, INFORMS, vol. 48(4), pages 671-683, November.
    6. David A. Hensher & Chinh Ho & Matthew J. Beck, 2017. "A simplified and practical alternative way to recognise the role of household characteristics in determining an individual’s preferences: the case of automobile choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 225-240, January.
    7. Daziano, Ricardo A. & Achtnicht, Martin, 2012. "Forecasting adoption of ultra-low-emission vehicles using the GHK simulator and Bayes estimates of a multinomial probit model," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-017, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    8. Achtnicht, Martin & Bühler, Georg & Hermeling, Claudia, 2008. "Impact of Service Station Networks on Purchase Decisions of Alternative-fuel Vehicles," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-088, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    9. Mara Thiene & Marco Boeri & Caspar Chorus, 2012. "Random Regret Minimization: Exploration of a New Choice Model for Environmental and Resource Economics," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 51(3), pages 413-429, March.
    10. Martin Achtnicht, 2012. "German car buyers’ willingness to pay to reduce CO 2 emissions," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 113(3), pages 679-697, August.
    11. John C. Whitehead & Daniel K. Lew, 2016. "Estimating Recreation Benefits through Joint Estimation of Revealed and Stated Preference Discrete Choice Data," Working Papers 16-22, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    12. Daziano, Ricardo A. & Chiew, Esther, 2012. "Electric vehicles rising from the dead: Data needs for forecasting consumer response toward sustainable energy sources in personal transportation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 876-894.
    13. Lew, Daniel K. & Wallmo, Kristy, 2017. "Temporal stability of stated preferences for endangered species protection from choice experiments," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 87-97.

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